Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 25th Jul 2017 16:11 UTC
Internet & Networking

Today, Adobe announced that Flash will no longer be supported after 2020. Microsoft will phase out support for Flash in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer ahead of this date.

Flash led the way on the web for rich content, gaming, animations, and media of all kinds, and inspired many of the current web standards powering HTML5. Adobe has partnered with Microsoft, Google, Mozilla, Apple, and many others, to ensure that the open web could meet and exceed the experiences that Flash has traditionally provided. HTML5 standards, implemented across all modern browsers, provide these capabilities with improved performance, battery life, and increased security. We look forward to continuing to work with Adobe and our industry partners on enriching the open web without the need for plug-ins.

We will phase out Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer, culminating in the removal of Flash from Windows entirely by the end of 2020.

Adobe's own announcement is coughing up HTTP 500 errors right now; hence the link to Microsoft's announcement. You can also read Apple's/WebKit's announcement, and the one from Chrome/Google.

Order by: Score:
Good riddance.
by TheRealKMan on Tue 25th Jul 2017 16:33 UTC
TheRealKMan
Member since:
2016-12-20

My only complaint is they should just kill it now and tell anyone who doesn't like it to get stuffed.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Good riddance.
by flanque on Tue 25th Jul 2017 22:45 UTC in reply to "Good riddance."
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

It can be hard to believe but there are still many websites that use it. It's just irritating, but killing it now would break corners of the web that folk use.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Good riddance.
by Johann Chua on Wed 26th Jul 2017 05:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Good riddance."
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Yeah. My issuing bank uses Flash to display and print out credit card statements on their website. I guess without Flash they'd have to email a password-protected PDF. AFAICT they're just using a Flash app as a "secure" PDF viewer.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Good riddance.
by nicubunu on Wed 26th Jul 2017 06:11 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Good riddance."
nicubunu Member since:
2014-01-08

A password-protected PDF would be worse, it won't work on every viewer. They can generate a temporary PDF on the fly or they can put the link to the PDF in a protected area of the website.

Reply Score: 2

I've always Liked Flash
by franksands on Tue 25th Jul 2017 17:08 UTC
franksands
Member since:
2009-08-18

I know it's ridden with flaws and whatnot, but the first time I saw that eye4u animation, I was completely amazed. I find a pitty that they're shutting it down instead of fixing it. RIP Flash, I will always remember fondly.

Reply Score: 3

RE: I've always Liked Flash
by Megol on Wed 26th Jul 2017 09:59 UTC in reply to "I've always Liked Flash"
Megol Member since:
2011-04-11

I know it's ridden with flaws and whatnot, but the first time I saw that eye4u animation, I was completely amazed. I find a pitty that they're shutting it down instead of fixing it. RIP Flash, I will always remember fondly.


The original system was nice and clean. Later versions? Bloated crap.

Reply Score: 3

Signaling The End of an Epoch.
by dionicio on Tue 25th Jul 2017 17:25 UTC
dionicio
Member since:
2006-07-12

No more untamed wandering, coders. Concord, or be a lone ranger.

Reply Score: 2

Plug-ins
by dionicio on Tue 25th Jul 2017 17:37 UTC
dionicio
Member since:
2006-07-12

Catheters. Always feel a sense of -treason- on my applications not behaving as expected. Most of the time, due to those catheters. Sometimes installed without user permission.

Reply Score: 2

Great News!
by SitrucKram on Tue 25th Jul 2017 17:43 UTC
SitrucKram
Member since:
2013-12-02

Now Microsoft just needs to do the same with Silverlight.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Great News!
by dionicio on Tue 25th Jul 2017 19:10 UTC in reply to "Great News!"
dionicio Member since:
2006-07-12

Agree, always felt that was out of -Feud. After this, amounts to turbulence in the flow of the markets.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Great News!
by drstorm on Thu 27th Jul 2017 17:29 UTC in reply to "Great News!"
drstorm Member since:
2009-04-24

Silverlight is already deprecated.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Great News!
by darknexus on Thu 27th Jul 2017 19:50 UTC in reply to "RE: Great News!"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Silverlight is already deprecated.

But not killed. Microsoft's own apps still use it, e.g. the Skype for Business (formerly called Lync) web-based control panel. Windows 10 comes with it installed, and Windows 7's Microsoft Update system always wants to try to push it.
If Adobe follows through with what they're planning, Flash won't be deprecated; it will be dead and gone.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Great News!
by kriston on Sat 29th Jul 2017 04:08 UTC in reply to "Great News!"
kriston Member since:
2007-04-11

I used to think the same thing about Silverlight, but someone pointed out to me that Silverlight is marketed as a Flash alternative, but it's actually a full-blown Microsoft .NET C# runtime virtual machine. It's their version of the JRE.

But nobody cares.

Flash is more correctly compared to Microsoft Blackbird, the rendering engine for the long dead MSN, the Microsoft Network dial-up online service.

Reply Score: 1

My school and work will be pissed
by Square on Tue 25th Jul 2017 17:51 UTC
Square
Member since:
2005-10-01

My school, and work uses flash for its online teaching of stuff. I'm not sure what they will do, there is only so much you can do with normal web standards.

Reply Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Too bad for them. Using Flash not only opens critical vulnerabilities, but causes problems for any accessibility aides that might be needed for special needs students. Any school using Flash-based software deserves the roasting they will surely receive!

Reply Score: 5

Square Member since:
2005-10-01

Ohh, I wish they would do something more modern, if only that I wouldn't have to deal with modern browsers going "wtf flash, really?" But at school how do you emulate an office environment that the writers can control fully w/o easy hacks. At work, well they have no excuse, its just videos with questions at the end, they just don't want to redo everything. But then again, I'm getting long in the tooth no idea what can be done in modern standards

Reply Score: 1

tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

> But at school how do you emulate an office environment that the writers can control fully w/o easy hacks.

You create dedicated OS environments and hand out preconfigured computers to the students. Hijacking control of a student's own machine is inexcusable.

Reply Score: 2

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

My school, and work uses flash for its online teaching of stuff. I'm not sure what they will do, there is only so much you can do with normal web standards.

My job used it for mandatory education. A small 800x600 flash with low resolution pictures. No scaling.
There is only so much you can do with webstandards: scaling, running unreal tournament, gmail, desktop applications.

Reply Score: 5

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"My school, and work uses flash for its online teaching of stuff. I'm not sure what they will do, there is only so much you can do with normal web standards.

My job used it for mandatory education. A small 800x600 flash with low resolution pictures. No scaling.
There is only so much you can do with webstandards: scaling, running unreal tournament, gmail, desktop applications.
"

And stuff like this: https://d3js.org/

Reply Score: 4

dionicio Member since:
2006-07-12

Just the format [and plug-in] going out. Those Houses coding on Adobe Tools, will not be left out at the cold. Just my expectation.

Reply Score: 2

dionicio Member since:
2006-07-12

Not condoning the mess HTML5 still is, at many corners. Lower the PR and bring formality.

Reply Score: 3

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

ummm....WTF are you talking about? YOu can do pretty much anything with web modern standards.

Reply Score: 6

icicle Member since:
2013-12-07

My school, and work uses flash for its online teaching of stuff. I'm not sure what they will do, there is only so much you can do with normal web standards.


Unfortunately the leadership at your school chose to use proprietary technology. And this is an example of what can happen. They should instead be teaching the open standards. What are you guys doing in flash that can't be done with open standards?

That said FINALLY Flash is dead! Glad for it. But I do feel for those who had invested in it. I knew this day would come and here it is.

Next, time to get people away from other proprietary software...

Reply Score: 1

Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

The problem with open standards is that they are often retards and so slow to come to fruition. How long for HTML5 after Flash was invented ? How long to set a portable image standard ? Movie ? Sound ? Seriously...

Reply Score: 3

Firefox announcement
by afmenez on Tue 25th Jul 2017 19:11 UTC
afmenez
Member since:
2017-07-25
browser crashed...
by yerverluvinunclebert on Tue 25th Jul 2017 19:23 UTC
yerverluvinunclebert
Member since:
2014-05-03

As soon as I opened this article in a new window, Firefox just crashed, is that a Flash landmine planted by Adobe to remind us just how buggy a browser can be running Flash? (BBC IPlayer was running in another tab - Flash version)

Reply Score: 2

Flash is definitely not dead
by yerverluvinunclebert on Tue 25th Jul 2017 19:31 UTC
yerverluvinunclebert
Member since:
2014-05-03

Since world-leading MMP games like World of Tanks use Flash to underpin the client (and that's millions of users worldwide) flash as a technology is not going away soon. It will become a niche tool.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Flash is definitely not dead
by darknexus on Tue 25th Jul 2017 19:41 UTC in reply to "Flash is definitely not dead"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

If Adobe actually intend to abandon it, it would be to their advantage to find a new niche tool or risk their entire product line becoming defunct.

Reply Score: 3

shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Adobe seem to be doing very nicely with Photoshop (and the rest of their tools) subsctiptions.

Flash is (AFAIK) a mere pin prick on their bottom line these days. They probably spend as much on fixing it as they get in revenue.

Reply Score: 3

Athlander Member since:
2008-03-10

Adobe seem to be doing very nicely with Photoshop (and the rest of their tools) subsctiptions.

Flash is (AFAIK) a mere pin prick on their bottom line these days. They probably spend as much on fixing it as they get in revenue.


He's referring to the makers of "world-leading MMP games", not Adobe itself.

Reply Score: 2

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

ummm.....Browser vendors will be disallowing flash by the end of 2020 so it is dead.

Reply Score: 2

yerverluvinunclebert Member since:
2014-05-03

ummm.....Browser vendors will be disallowing flash by the end of 2020 so it is dead.


It does not require a traditional browser. It runs in its own context.

This link describes the use of Flash in World of Tanks. It is interesting to see how Flash is really used in the grown-up world.

http://ftr.wot-news.com/2014/07/04/world-of-tanks-game-user-interfa...

Edited 2017-07-25 22:13 UTC

Reply Score: 1

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

Well isn't that nice? 99% of flash will be dead and the only things left for it will be games that are not going to be around for a long time after.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Flash is definitely not dead
by nicubunu on Wed 26th Jul 2017 06:19 UTC in reply to "Flash is definitely not dead"
nicubunu Member since:
2014-01-08

Are you sure this game will still be relevant 3 years from now? Are you sure developers won't put an update to replace the technology for the Windows client?

Reply Score: 3

yerverluvinunclebert Member since:
2014-05-03

Are you sure this game will still be relevant 3 years from now?
It is the question that is not relevant.

Are you sure developers won't put an update to replace the technology for the Windows client??

Am I sure that Queen Elizabeth won't abdicate? Your questions are irrelevant and ridiculous.

Who gives a monkey's cuss what they will do? The point is they don't need one of the main browsers so they don't have to dump the technology - and that's it.

Any more inane questions?

Reply Score: 1

nicubunu Member since:
2014-01-08

MMP are like fads, they come and go to be replaced by other titles. And 3 years is a long time.

As I never tried World of Tanks, I don't know how and why does it uses Flash. But I understand it works on various platforms, including iOS, where Flash is not available.

PS: you can be sure in a while Queen Elizabeth will not be any more and will be replaced by someone else. This is true for people and for technology.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Wow, who crapped in your cereal? The long and short of this is very simple: if Adobe kill off Flash in its entirety (including sdk, development toolchain, etc) then they absolutely will have to switch technologies, because eventually what they have will cease to function and, as if that isn't enough, their development tools will also cease to be viable. Browser or otherwise is 100% irrelevant all right, just not the way you thought.
Any more grumpy retorts?

Reply Score: 2

yerverluvinunclebert Member since:
2014-05-03

If... But ONLY if Queen Elizabeth abdicates.

Reply Score: 1

Regarding The Elimination Of Flash...
by randy7376 on Tue 25th Jul 2017 22:34 UTC
randy7376
Member since:
2005-08-08

Good-bye!

Good luck!

Good riddance!

Reply Score: 5

Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Or just... Finally!

Reply Score: 3

Flash's one backhanded advantage
by gld59 on Wed 26th Jul 2017 05:48 UTC
gld59
Member since:
2012-11-09

It's already gone, of course, but one advantage of the time before HTML5 was that by without Flash there were no autoplay videos. With HTML5, it's not as simple to prevent these steaming piles of unwelcome excrement.

Reply Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

gld59,

It's already gone, of course, but one advantage of the time before HTML5 was that by without Flash there were no autoplay videos. With HTML5, it's not as simple to prevent these steaming piles of unwelcome excrement.


This!

At least flash was very easy to selectively enable/disable as wanted. Many HTML5 websites have become extremely resource heavy; I can't stand that firefox doesn't let me disable things like autoplay. Some news websites that I actually want to read have become much worse once they incorporated HTML5 elements that I can't disable. I feel like in the transition to HTML5 we actually lost control over bloat, now we get it whether we want it or not ;)

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Phloptical
by Phloptical on Wed 26th Jul 2017 08:13 UTC
Phloptical
Member since:
2006-10-10

While we're killing stuff off, can we also put a large caliber bullet in java?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Phloptical
by darknexus on Wed 26th Jul 2017 12:06 UTC in reply to "Comment by Phloptical"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

While we're killing stuff off, can we also put a large caliber bullet in java?

Wouldn't do any good. It's been shot several times and always comes back from the dead. Might need to be burned instead. ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Phloptical
by tidux on Wed 26th Jul 2017 20:37 UTC in reply to "Comment by Phloptical"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Server-type Java applications and Android apps are usually fine. It's the desktop iterations of the JVM that always blew goats. Nowadays if you want cross platform desktop support you use something like Qt or Electron or a straight webapp.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Phloptical
by CATs on Thu 27th Jul 2017 08:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Phloptical"
CATs Member since:
2017-06-09

"Android apps are usually fine"? Seriously?? Really, you're not kidding?..

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Phloptical
by modmans2ndcoming on Sat 29th Jul 2017 16:41 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Phloptical"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

electron all the way.

Reply Score: 2

Didn't they already do this?
by dcantrell on Wed 26th Jul 2017 11:06 UTC
dcantrell
Member since:
2009-08-28

I've grown accustomed to Adobe killing Flash annually, but is that not actually the case?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Didn't they already do this?
by Kochise on Wed 26th Jul 2017 11:39 UTC in reply to "Didn't they already do this?"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

A shot in the head would have been faster than anally attempts to plug the holes.

Reply Score: 2

While you are at it...
by bolomkxxviii on Fri 28th Jul 2017 13:31 UTC
bolomkxxviii
Member since:
2006-05-19

How about fixing Adobe Acrobat?
The Reader is a huge bloated mess that screams for updates more often than Windows does. Why can Foxit do the same thing in 1/10 the size?
Acrobat Professional hasn't had a major update since...forever.
Now that you are not working on Flash anymore, please redirect some resources to Acrobat.

Reply Score: 2

RE: While you are at it...
by Kochise on Fri 28th Jul 2017 14:06 UTC in reply to "While you are at it..."
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

I don't care about Acrobat. I do LibreOffice (even if it have its quirks) then export in PDF. Job done.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: While you are at it...
by modmans2ndcoming on Sat 29th Jul 2017 16:47 UTC in reply to "RE: While you are at it..."
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

I use Microsoft Office to do the same.

Edited 2017-07-29 16:47 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: While you are at it...
by modmans2ndcoming on Sat 29th Jul 2017 16:46 UTC in reply to "While you are at it..."
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

We had to replace Fox-It reader on our Citrix images because it was crashing when it tried to render some echo cardiogram reports. Adobe Acrobat reader did not crash.

Also, it is possible to prevent unnecessary plugins from launching when Acrobat reader loads which makes it much less bloated.

Edited 2017-07-29 16:47 UTC

Reply Score: 2