Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st Aug 2017 22:29 UTC
Android

Today, we are officially introducing Android 8.0 Oreo, the latest release of the platform - and it's smarter, faster and more powerful than ever. It comes with new features like picture-in-picture and Autofill to help you navigate tasks seamlessly. Plus, it's got stronger security protections and speed improvements that keep you safe and moving at lightspeed. When you're on your next adventure, Android Oreo is the superhero to have by your side (or in your pocket!).

Coming to a device near you. Eventually. Maybe. But probably not.

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Advertising
by Treza on Mon 21st Aug 2017 23:07 UTC
Treza
Member since:
2006-01-11

KitKat, now Oreo. Why must it look like advertising ?

I propose "Orange".
Fruits are healthier and taste better than these awful industrial biscuits made of sugar and cardboard.


Bummer, Orange is also a brand !

Reply Score: 9

RE: Advertising
by unclefester on Mon 21st Aug 2017 23:59 UTC in reply to "Advertising"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

KitKat, now Oreo. Why must it look like advertising ?

I propose "Orange".
Fruits are healthier and taste better than these awful industrial biscuits made of sugar and cardboard.


Bummer, Orange is also a brand !


Looking forward to Android Pringles and Android Red Bull.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Advertising
by Morgan on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 01:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Advertising"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

They have to be desserts though, right? So maybe Payday and Reese's.

Though, I do wish they would lay off the branding and go back to generic desserts, maybe Parfait or Peanut Brittle for the next version, and Red Velvet Cake (skipping "Q" as you did, because I can't think of a generic dessert for that letter).

Reply Score: 5

RE[3]: Advertising
by unclefester on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 07:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Advertising"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

They have to be desserts though, right? So maybe Payday and Reese's.

Though, I do wish they would lay off the branding and go back to generic desserts, maybe Parfait or Peanut Brittle for the next version, and Red Velvet Cake (skipping "Q" as you did, because I can't think of a generic dessert for that letter).


How about Australia's national dessert pavlova?
http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/traditional-pavlova/5e336628-e743-4...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Advertising
by Lobotomik on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 09:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Advertising"
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03
Opera
by Nico57 on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 00:39 UTC
Nico57
Member since:
2006-12-18

Android Opera would have been a really nice name. :-p

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_cake

(and would have spawned a truckload of threads about running Opera for Android on Android Opera...)

Reply Score: 3

Pie, Key Lime
by rafial on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 01:17 UTC
rafial
Member since:
2007-12-04

One of the most interesting features of Android Oreo applies mostly to devices will ship with it (rather than receiving an update). Devices that ship with it are required to support "Project Treble", which is the first practical thing Google has done to address the Android update problem (other than ask OEMs nicely to try harder). Treble-ized devices have a stable and formalized hardware abstraction layer enforced by a certification suite that will that will be capable of hosting newer versions of Android without change. Most importantly, it'll be required to be able to support the version of Android built from the publicly released AOSP sources.

Since this only applies to devices that ship with Android Oreo out of the box, it'll be at least two years before we if the scheme works as intended, but at least _something_ is being done.

Reply Score: 8

RE: Pie, Key Lime
by jbauer on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 14:02 UTC in reply to "Pie, Key Lime"
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

One of the most interesting features of Android Oreo applies mostly to devices will ship with it (rather than receiving an update). Devices that ship with it are required to support "Project Treble", which is the first practical thing Google has done to address the Android update problem (other than ask OEMs nicely to try harder). Treble-ized devices have a stable and formalized hardware abstraction layer enforced by a certification suite that will that will be capable of hosting newer versions of Android without change. Most importantly, it'll be required to be able to support the version of Android built from the publicly released AOSP sources.

Since this only applies to devices that ship with Android Oreo out of the box, it'll be at least two years before we if the scheme works as intended, but at least _something_ is being done.


Like with all things that Google has prefixed with "project" that pretty much amounted to nothing, I remain skeptical.

However it's a very good reason to NOT buy any Android device which is not running Android O out of the box. Just in case.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Pie, Key Lime
by moondevil on Wed 23rd Aug 2017 06:23 UTC in reply to "Pie, Key Lime"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

This will hardly change anything because updates are still going to be delivered by OEMs and mobile operators, and Google doesn't want to disallow customizations.

http://androidbackstage.blogspot.de/2017/08/episode-75-project-treb...

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Lazarus
by Lazarus on Wed 23rd Aug 2017 20:06 UTC in reply to "Pie, Key Lime"
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

Shame that Project Treble only really covers the Android Framework and not the kernel, where the really scary bugs are... damned constantly mutating Linux kernel and it's lack of stable interfaces and toothless GPL...

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Sidux
by Sidux on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 06:41 UTC
Sidux
Member since:
2015-03-10

No news about Go "optimised" version release? Seems a bit rushed just to catch the eclipse.

Reply Score: 1

Thom's comment is spot on the mark
by shotsman on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 07:03 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

Coming to a device near you. Eventually. Maybe. But probably not.

Says all you need to know about the fragmented Android environment.
Google could sort it out but seem to not want to.

Reply Score: 2

The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

Google would love to sort it out, but they've kind of dug themselves into a hole by making it so open. You can't have an open operating system and still have it locked down.

Reply Score: 5

Troels Member since:
2005-07-11

Probably because except for a few geeks, noone really cares about software updates. I am a geek, and I don't even care. The updates are released so often they don't contain many visible changes. These Android updates seems almost as irrelevant as the Windows 10 creators update

Reply Score: 2

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Probably because except for a few geeks, noone really cares about software updates. I am a geek, and I don't even care. The updates are released so often they don't contain many visible changes. These Android updates seems almost as irrelevant as the Windows 10 creators update


I run devices with 4.4, 5.01 and 6.01 on a daily basis. The practical differences are negligible IMO. The big jump was from 2.3 to 4.0.

Reply Score: 2

Troels Member since:
2005-07-11

Yes, exactly, and this is why i don´t get all the fuss.

Though to be honest i was waiting impatiently for the 5.0 update because it had new pretty looks... But after having it for a few weeks i would be fine with 4.X again. I think the only difference for me between the Samsung version of 7.0 i have now and the Samsung 4.X series, is that i no longer run Nova Launcher.

Reply Score: 2

Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

Yes, exactly, and this is why i don´t get all the fuss.


It really depends on what you want. On my main phone I constantly use multi-window, which is a relatively new feature. On my older phones I couldn't care less.

Reply Score: 3

:D
by General_Edmund_Duke on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 08:26 UTC
General_Edmund_Duke
Member since:
2014-05-17

"Coming to a device near you. Eventually. Maybe. But probably not."
You`ve made my day. Thank you Thom. :-)

Reply Score: 1

Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 20:52 UTC
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

Coming to a device near you. Eventually. Maybe. But probably not.


Why not? One of my phones already runs it, my main one will run it by the end of the year, and my other phones will run it due to the magic of alternative ROMs.

So... don't generalise.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Sodki
by wocowboy on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 21:20 UTC in reply to "Comment by Sodki"
wocowboy Member since:
2006-06-01

Your own comment is a perfect illustration why it is OK to "generalize". You say you have Android O because you use alternative ROM's. You are among the .01% of Android users who use these pieces of software that are unofficial and not supported by Google, manufacturers, and carriers. Therefore, generally, hardly anyone of any significant numbers will see Android O for years to come.

I dabbled in alternative ROMS a few years ago myself. Some worked fine while some required constant tinkering to remain stable and some were just plain bad. Some didn't even allow the use of some my phones' features. I got tired of them and switched to "stock" via the official Google phones.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Tue 22nd Aug 2017 21:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Sodki"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

You say you have Android O because you use alternative ROM's.


No. That phone is a Nexus one. My main phone is not, but it's confirmed to receive the O update (sometime...). I only have alternative ROMs on my older phones, none of them receive official security updates now. I don't actually disagree with Thom here.

The thing that really pisses me off about Android upgrades is the planned obsolescence. Only 2 years of updates for a $£€800+ phone when I buy it straight from you, Google? And you don't provide official insurance outside North America? Hell no! Google still needs to learn a bunch of stuff from Apple.

Reply Score: 2

Cbbbap
by Bringbackanonposting on Wed 23rd Aug 2017 09:00 UTC
Bringbackanonposting
Member since:
2005-11-16

I thinks it's amazing my 2012 Nexus 4 I use for work every day running 4.2 still able to run apps I use. Those apps still update. I can still back it up. I don't have to upgrade my computer to connect to it. Fruitylicious! True about 2.x to 4.x. I still prefer the 4.x series to newer.

Reply Score: 2