Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 1st Feb 2018 19:12 UTC
Amiga & AROS

The Faery Tale Adventure was a computer game that I created for the Amiga in 1987. It was moderately popular for its day, and was ported to a number of platforms, including MS-DOS and the Sega Genesis.

I decided to write this account because, much to my surprise, there is still interest in the game - I occasionally get fan email or inquiries as to whether there will ever be a sequel. And so I thought it might be interesting to tell the story of how the game came to be, and what happened afterwards.

An account by David Joiner of a game he wrote for the Amiga. One of those stories that's just fun to read, no ifs and buts. Grab a coffee and enjoy.

Order by: Score:
Loved it
by filmamigo on Fri 2nd Feb 2018 01:00 UTC
filmamigo
Member since:
2010-01-12

I loved Faery Tale on the Amiga - one of my favourites that I played for hours and hours. I was a budding programmer and had started drafting a similar game for the C128. When I got an Amiga and saw Faery Tale it was everything and more that I wanted to accomplish.

It’s worth reading through the article to Part 3, where the author discusses making a sequel. I love the quasi-3D projection that he is working up. I’d love to see a fresh game that doesn’t rely on an off-the-shelf game engine like Unreal. Gaming is missing that sense of new and different experiences when every game is built using the same couple of engines.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Loved it
by Alfman on Fri 2nd Feb 2018 05:03 UTC in reply to "Loved it"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

filmamigo,

It’s worth reading through the article to Part 3, where the author discusses making a sequel. I love the quasi-3D projection that he is working up. I’d love to see a fresh game that doesn’t rely on an off-the-shelf game engine like Unreal. Gaming is missing that sense of new and different experiences when every game is built using the same couple of engines.



Yea, but there are more developers able to produce game engines than there is a need for them. I suspect many of us may have worked on game engines as pet projects before having to get a real job to pay the bills. Like a lot of things, the trend has been mass consolidation with huge shares of the market being gobbled up by a few at the very top.

I think the author in the article was spot on, he could do it, but it would be a labor of love, not something that would make economic sense. Since he's retiring soon and by his own accounts doesn't need money, he could do it just for fun if he gets bored with retirement.

Personally, I feel like I have so many "retirement" projects I'd love to work on, but then there's a very real possibility I'll never earn enough to do so ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Loved it
by heddwch on Fri 2nd Feb 2018 16:28 UTC in reply to "RE: Loved it"
heddwch Member since:
2011-05-30

I think there's a basic fallacy in there that it has to take money. I strongly believe someone can still construct their vision and profit from it, e.g. Minecraft. It might take forever, but it doesn't have to be a "risky venture," because it doesn't have to have thousands of dollars of capital investment just to work on fun things.
TL;DR Don't kill your dreams because the profit projections you haven't done are not in your favor by default ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Loved it
by Alfman on Sat 3rd Feb 2018 04:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Loved it"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

heddwch,

I think there's a basic fallacy in there that it has to take money. I strongly believe someone can still construct their vision and profit from it, e.g. Minecraft.


Well, it really depends. Most people cannot afford professional help, but if you can find a talented group of people willing to donate their time (at least at first), then sure they can build great things. I genuinely love to see what ordinary people can do. In a way, seeing what we can do with limited resources is far more impressive than the wealthy who might do greater things, but had more resources and financial advantages.

TL;DR Don't kill your dreams because the profit projections you haven't done are not in your favor by default


It's not that I disagree with this sentiment. However it is important not to mislead people about career choices based on the exceptions to the rule. It is very difficult for the majority of indy game devs to make a living. Of course, if you end up making money, great! But if you don't otherwise have the money to pay for shelter/food/healthcare/utilities/etc, then just be aware that most game devs that go the indy route end up making considerably less than a normal job.

Edited 2018-02-03 04:42 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Good post
by heddwch on Fri 2nd Feb 2018 16:22 UTC
heddwch
Member since:
2011-05-30

I had never heard of the game, but I love this type of retrospective; I filled the boredom gaps of a few hours with this.
Last time I swung in, this post hadn't garnered any comments, and I just stopped back in to make sure it got one. Please don't stop posting this kind of thing. ;) There's no controversy, so it doesn't reel in the majority that seem to live on that, but for those of us that just need a little fun obscura, this is the real content.
Thanks, Thom

Reply Score: 4

Forget that
by drcoldfoot on Sat 3rd Feb 2018 02:47 UTC
drcoldfoot
Member since:
2006-08-25

I'm looking for a sequel to Sierra's Space Quest!!! I miss that game engine and comedy.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Forget that
by Alfman on Sat 3rd Feb 2018 04:34 UTC in reply to "Forget that"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

drcoldfoot,

I'm looking for a sequel to Sierra's Space Quest!!! I miss that game engine and comedy.


I enjoyed many sierra games as a kid. Although more recently I watched some of the retro gameplay and I noticed many sierra titles can be seriously faulted for all the pixel hunting and item combinations that had to be tediously brute forced (or just looked up). If I were replaying old games today, I'd probably prefer games in the style of "the 7th guest".

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Forget that
by drcoldfoot on Tue 6th Feb 2018 01:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Forget that"
drcoldfoot Member since:
2006-08-25

Alfman,
Understood, even though the 80s never presented me with a chance to pixel hunt. I had to resort to the hintbooks sometimes. or Sierra BBS LOL

Edited 2018-02-06 01:51 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Forget that
by echo.ranger on Mon 5th Feb 2018 16:39 UTC in reply to "Forget that"
echo.ranger Member since:
2007-01-17

Two Guys from Andromeda, the creators of Space Quest, are working on one-- SpaceVenture.

http://spacequest.wikia.com/wiki/SpaceVenture

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Forget that
by drcoldfoot on Tue 6th Feb 2018 01:49 UTC in reply to "RE: Forget that"
drcoldfoot Member since:
2006-08-25

echo.ranger,
I can't wait til that goes public!!! I wonder how the 2 old farts from Andromeda are going to adjust to today's style of gameplay...

Edited 2018-02-06 01:50 UTC

Reply Score: 2

I quite liked it...
by wazoox on Mon 5th Feb 2018 18:15 UTC
wazoox
Member since:
2005-07-14

I played it on the Sega Megadrive. I don't know if it was much different from the Amiga version.
The CRPG addict ( https://crpgaddict.blogspot.com/ ) disliked it much, though ;)

Reply Score: 1