Linked by Adurbe on Fri 6th Jul 2018 22:23 UTC
Legal

A controversial overhaul of the EU's copyright law that sparked a fierce debate between internet giants and content creators has been rejected.

The proposed rules would have put more responsibility on websites to check for copyright infringements, and forced platforms to pay for linking to news.

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Postponed, not rejected
by TheCovvboyOnline on Sat 7th Jul 2018 10:34 UTC
TheCovvboyOnline
Member since:
2016-10-18

Unfortunately this hasn't been rejected but postponed so there can be a proper discussion about this in September. Hopefully amendments will be made that stop this being so completely at odds with what the Internet is all about.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Postponed, not rejected
by The1stImmortal on Sun 8th Jul 2018 18:31 UTC in reply to "Postponed, not rejected"
The1stImmortal Member since:
2005-10-20

Unfortunately this hasn't been rejected but postponed so there can be a proper discussion about this in September. Hopefully amendments will be made that stop this being so completely at odds with what the Internet is all about.

Not even that, they've just rejected the Trialogue making a decision that can't be amended by the parliament.

All this vote means is that the proposed law will have the opportunity to be amended by the EU Parliament instead of it being a "take it or leave it" vote later on.

The EU legislative processes are terrible.

Reply Score: 1

Re:
by kurkosdr on Sat 7th Jul 2018 14:55 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

I think it's time to make Tor part of every browser...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Re:
by yoshi314@gmail.com on Sat 7th Jul 2018 15:15 UTC in reply to "Re:"
yoshi314@gmail.com Member since:
2009-12-14

china is pretty good at blocking Tor, why do you think it would be any different elsewhere?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Re:
by project_2501 on Sat 7th Jul 2018 21:28 UTC in reply to "Re:"
project_2501 Member since:
2006-03-20

why do people blindly trust Tor?

It was developed by the US military and funded for a long time by them.

They released the code.

Seems like a nice honeypot to me ..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_(anonymity_network)#History

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Re:
by grat on Sun 8th Jul 2018 16:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Re:"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

why do people blindly trust Tor?

...

They released the code.


Sums it up nicely, I think.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Re:
by Vanders on Mon 9th Jul 2018 08:46 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Re:"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

That's only part of it, though. You have to trust the exit nodes. There's no mechanism of trust for the exit nodes. This has been a real problem for years, and there's no reason to suspect that police agencies & state actors aren't actively exploiting it. I would, if I were them, given how trivial it is.

Reply Score: 3

Unfortunately, â¦
by rener on Sun 8th Jul 2018 09:45 UTC
rener
Member since:
2006-02-27

…, they will pass it later this year after re-phrasing some minor sentences. As usual in the not very democratic EU apparatus ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Unfortunately, �
by kwan_e on Mon 9th Jul 2018 03:36 UTC in reply to "Unfortunately, â¦"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

As usual in the not very democratic EU apparatus ;)


That's because it's not a democracy. It's a republic.

Whooops, accidentally channeled an American.

Reply Score: 3