Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Jul 2018 22:28 UTC
Apple

If you're an Apple customer living in China who didn't already opt out of having your iCloud data stored locally, here's a good reason to do so now. That information, the data belonging to China-based iCloud users which includes emails and text messages, is now being stored by a division of China Telecom, the state-owned telco.

The operator’s Tianyi cloud storage business unit has taken the reins for iCloud China, according to a WeChat post from China Telecom. Apple separately confirmed the change to TechCrunch.

Privacy is very important to us at Apple. Unless you're Chinese - then you're shit out of luck.

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v Comment by jigzat
by jigzat on Thu 19th Jul 2018 03:14 UTC
Clear T+C
by Adurbe on Thu 19th Jul 2018 07:45 UTC
Adurbe
Member since:
2005-07-06

FINALLY Apple have clear T+C.

"The Chinese state have all your data and will use it to spy on you and your friends. Everything you do or say will be fed into the Social Credit System. Be a good citizen."

Reply Score: 2

Shocker!
by Ithamar on Thu 19th Jul 2018 09:36 UTC
Ithamar
Member since:
2006-03-20

BreakingNews: Apple has to follow China law to be able to operate in China! Read all about it!

*duh*......

Reply Score: 2

RE: Shocker!
by kurkosdr on Sun 22nd Jul 2018 13:36 UTC in reply to "Shocker!"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

BreakingNews: Apple has to follow China law to be able to operate in China! Read all about it!

*duh*......


One of the reasons iDevices are considered a status symbol in China is because Chinese Android devices can't access Google services, which makes for an inferior user experience as all kinds of OEMs and Alibabas fill in the gaps with homegrown apps.

So, depending on your sense of morals, Google pulling out of China (so they won't have to comply with Chinese law) is either the dumbest move ever that restricted consumer choice in China or a strong moral stand on Google's part (back then). Pick the one you are most comfortable with...

Edited 2018-07-22 13:38 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Understandable
by flypig on Thu 19th Jul 2018 09:41 UTC
flypig
Member since:
2005-07-13

I can understand why Apple have done this to conform to local laws. As an EU citizen it reassures me that companies can't send my data outside the EU as a means of circumventing EU privacy laws. It's often argued that the Chinese authorities abuse their surveillance powers, so the situation may be very different, but my point is that I wouldn't want Apple to ignore EU rules, so it's hard to argue they should do the same in China.

The better response from Apple would be to increase their use of what they refer to as end-to-end encryption, which would improve security and privacy for Chinese users and everyone else alike.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202303

Reply Score: 3

RE: Understandable
by Ford Prefect on Thu 19th Jul 2018 11:41 UTC in reply to "Understandable"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

I believe global players should always adhere to local laws. But they also have a responsibility that extends beyond local laws.

In the case of China I would expect Apple to stop conducting business if it were not possible under terms that allow them to protect their customers.

Edited 2018-07-19 11:41 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Understandable
by flypig on Thu 19th Jul 2018 12:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Understandable"
flypig Member since:
2005-07-13

Sure, I agree with that too. I don't want to get into the ethics of China's surveillance powers, because I've never lived there. Since I do live in the UK, I can say that state surveillance powers in the UK are unacceptably intrusive, but I wouldn't argue that Apple should stop selling their products here.

However, I would argue that there are clear ways for Apple to improve the technological privacy protections of their Cloud services (which are generally already pretty good compared to the competition), and so I'd prefer them to strengthen these instead of pulling out of the UK or China markets. That, in my view, is how they can counter the pithy jibe Thom added at the end of his post.

Reply Score: 3