Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 25th May 2004 03:27 UTC
Gnome I am much into learning all-about-Gnome development lately, using GTK# and Mono. Unfortunately, the Mono/GTK# documentation is not that complete in regards of developing Gnome applications and this has being quite a stumbling block. The release of the "Official GNOME 2 Developer's Guide" book felt like a godsend to help clarify a few points about the GTK+ and Gnome architecture. But was it really?
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Thank you
by Jason Lotito on Tue 25th May 2004 04:18 UTC

I was looking at buying this book, and I had been pondering for some time. This review pretty much sums up what I needed to hear.

Available the correct index and later the whole book
by Guido on Tue 25th May 2004 05:32 UTC

You can download the correct index from http://nostarch.com/frameset.php?startat=gnome_toc .

No Star Press is going however to release a free version of the book under Creative Commons, non-commercial license.

v corrections
by -=StephenB=- on Tue 25th May 2004 08:37 UTC
gtk# and mono?
by fuser on Tue 25th May 2004 09:39 UTC

Oh, now I understand all this mess in this days about .net and mono, eugenia is learning it ;)

...
by Anonymous on Tue 25th May 2004 10:06 UTC

I can't bring myself anything about Mono, but GTK is looking better as long as the documentation is up to date, and perhaps even reveals the direction they are going in ahead of time. An auto-complete IDE is still needed to ease the amount of typing that C language code requires. Real good and up to date information about makefiles and automake would be incredibly helpful. The last area that is interesting to know about are things like protocols and program design in the Unix tradition, separating mechanism from policy and creating simple, clear, and general program modules. The old C code will be around for a long time to come.

Anjuta does autocomplite while you type your code
by chris on Tue 25th May 2004 10:41 UTC

Hi Anonymous,

Anjuta autocompletes as-you-type your code: this applies not only to APIs in the libraries (like Glib) but also to variables, functions et cetera that you just defined.

This is working really well in the last stable release, and in the complex, even if there are still some sharp corners, overall Anjuta feels good.

Ciao, chris

....
by Anonymous on Tue 25th May 2004 10:55 UTC

I tried it before and it wasn't up to par, but I'll try the new version. I'd like an emacs that autocompletes GTK+, Glib, Pango, etc.

Scaffold
by David on Tue 25th May 2004 11:50 UTC

Anjuta autocompletes as-you-type your code: this applies not only to APIs in the libraries (like Glib) but also to variables, functions et cetera that you just defined.

I'm not familiar much with Gnome tools, but didn't Anjuta get stopped at some point and a an IDE called Scaffold came along? It looked pretty good.

Anjuta
by Anonymous on Tue 25th May 2004 16:38 UTC

Anjuta is very much around and being actively developed.

Java-GNOME
by johnMG on Wed 26th May 2004 05:30 UTC

Of possible interest to folks looking to write Java Gnome/GTK+ apps:
http://java-gnome.sourceforge.net/

Bonobo
by Raj on Wed 26th May 2004 08:28 UTC

I guess Bonobo is missing .I feel they are ditching it

More Pictures?!?!!
by James Dixon on Wed 26th May 2004 18:54 UTC

This is a programming book! Pictures are a waste of space; if you want to see what the app looks like, try compiling and running it.

I thought this book was excellent. It could have easily topped 600+ pages with some fluff added, but I'm glad it didn't.