Linked by Ronald Schouten on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 18:46 UTC
Fedora Core I've been using Fedora Core 1 (FC1) for a few months now and have been quite happy with it. It is a good distribution with a minimal number of bugs (if any) that have caused me problems. Of course, it took some tweaking to get it just right, but I can accept that for the price.
Order by: Score:
Nvidia cards
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 18:56 UTC

You can get the 2.6.5 and 2.6.6 kernels with 8K stack size in RPM form here.

http://www.linuxant.com/driverloader/wlan/full/downloads-fc2-kernel...

Choice of software
by Wee-Jin Goh on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:00 UTC

That Evolution thing is really annoying. Even if you use KDE, the default mail client is Evolution. It probably makes sense if you want a uniform user experience, but if a user wants to switch from the default GNOME to KDE, they probably want to use the native KDE apps.

RE: Choice of software
by Eugenia on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:02 UTC

No, not really. Evolution is integral to the Red Hat experience, many things have been "built" around it in the product. So, even if you decide to use twm, Evolution should continue be the default mail client because of the above reason.

Screen shifted to the right
by HagerR15 on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:10 UTC

The screen's shift to the right is caused by the "nv" video driver. The driver works really well, it's just one of its quirks. All of my systems with Nvidia cards (using any distribution) have that same shift to the right.

Downloading and installing NVIDIA's Linux video driver, which does not have the "right-hand shift" of the "nv" driver, will fix that and gives you 3D to boot!

v Yaaaaawwwwwwnnnnn....
by TenaciousOne on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:12 UTC
Upgrading from Core-1 to Core-2 via Yum or up2date
by anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:19 UTC

Have you noticed that most of these articles are based on the fact that the users basically had to do a clean install? Is there a way, either via yum or up2date, which could point you to the /core/ directories to do an upgrade? Wouldn't that be easier?

Easier upgrade
by Bab on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:31 UTC

Sure, just install apt-get from fedora.us and modify /etc/apt/source.plist, and replace the fedora/1 paths to fedora/2 paths, run apt-get update, apt-get dist-upgrade and go eat, there is about 250-300 packages to update.

Hostname
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:35 UTC

You can easily set the hostname during installation when you set the network preferences.

If you didnt, just go to the system-config-network utility and then go to the DNS tab and set your hostname.

Dosn't seem very difficult from this end...

two things
by cAPTAIN^k on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:45 UTC

firstly, I was disappointed that the evolution email client which has been so famously reported on for being able to work with exchange did not infact have any option for that when setting up an account

secondly, I didn't have any problem with the media test at all - it worked flawlessly...

Re: RE: Choice of software
by DeadFish Man on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 19:48 UTC

No, not really. Evolution is integral to the Red Hat experience, many things have been "built" around it in the product. So, even if you decide to use twm, Evolution should continue be the default mail client because of the above reason.

It still doesn't make sense at all. However, RedHat and its derivatives are famous for its positioning about KDE...

To those interested in a nice KDE experience, keep away from RedHat/Fedora unless you're inclined to have to struggle to make it behaves well (like I did).

DeadFish Man

not really
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:01 UTC

"To those interested in a nice KDE experience, keep away from RedHat/Fedora unless you're inclined to have to struggle to make it behaves well (like I did). "

it was pretty easy to change the theme, remove the icons and replace them with my favorites. no struggle at all

A Contradition right at the begining.
by wild card on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:02 UTC

It is a good distribution with a minimal number of bugs (if any) that have caused me problems.

How can it be good if it has bugs that cause you problems, that can't be good.

iimf
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:10 UTC

"While customizing the Gnome panel I found the InputMethod Switcher utility. This seemed wonderful. I envisioned an applet sitting in my panel that would allow me to click it and start entering Japanese characters into supported applications. Not so fast though. Adding this utility did not work. I see no new icon on the panel.

Why is it never easy? Oh well, I'll come back to this later."

this is one of the major changes that usually doesnt get mentioned in the reviews. good job on that.

"How can it be good if it has bugs that cause you problems, that can't be good. "

probably because they can be classified as annoyances or because the reviewer didnt mind and found the other improvements worth while

Re: not really
by DeadFish Man on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:21 UTC

it was pretty easy to change the theme, remove the icons and replace them with my favorites. no struggle at all

Some software made specifically to use some KDE features don't work with RedHat even if you compile it from source. Everybody and their dogs these days knows that RedHat trashed their KDE implementation in order to make it works a little bit like Gnome since the 8.0 days.

There are a workaround for it: http://kde-redhat.sf.net

However, I couldn't upgrade my KDE through apt with their repositories when I tried (Don't remember the error messages anymore). So I ended installing KDE binaries by hand, broking some dependencies and having a hell of a trouble to make apt accept what I did.

specific
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:24 UTC

"Some software made specifically to use some KDE features don't work with RedHat even if you compile it from source"

pretty vague. name them and blue curve doesnt look very gnomish to me. i didnt like the earlier versions but the fc2 one looks slick enough. i still prefer plastik thou

Mozilla
by J.F. on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:28 UTC

In FC2, mozilla and mozilla-mail are two seperate programs, much like FireFox and Thunderbird. You have to type "up2date mozilla-mail" in a terminal to install mozilla-mail. At that point, it's in the system menu and can be added to the panel (and Evolution deleted from the panel).

The error you encountered trying to run "mozilla -mail" arose from the fact that the installed mozilla is just the browser and composer, not the emailer. If you had done "up2date --show-available" you might have noticed mozilla-mail as one of the available packages.

Also, the media tester worked peachy on the DVD, so either it's different on the CD, or something specific to your system caused it to go out to lunch. As long as you have a DVDRW, I highly recommend getting the DVD distro as opposed to all the CDs. One disc is so much easier to handle than four.

worked fine
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 20:45 UTC

"Also, the media tester worked peachy on the DVD, so either it's different on the CD, or something specific to your system caused it to go out to lunch."

it seems to be specific to his system. media check worked fine here with 4 cds.

Re: specific
by DeadFish Man on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:05 UTC

pretty vague. name them and blue curve doesnt look very gnomish to me. i didnt like the earlier versions but the fc2 one looks slick enough. i still prefer plastik thou

YMMV, but I've found some glitches with the following KDE apps and I believe they're RedHat(9.0) only:

Juk: Don't play anything at all.

Amarok: Same as Juk.

Apollon: The preview section don't play anything, be it audio or video. Images are displayed fine though.

Digikam: Most of the buttons in the toolbar don't have its proper icon.

GwenView: Same as Digikam.

These are just the ones that I remember right now. I'm sure that there are others. I've tried to change the prefix of these apps during the compile stage in order to match the $KDEDIR and several other little tricks and tweaks, but didn't have success.

Of course there are alternatives for every one in that list in the GNOME camp, but except for XMMS (which is great), I'm not too fond of these alternatives.

And... Come on! There is nothing more gnome-ish in this world than BlueCurve.... :-)

Input method switcher
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:16 UTC

Believe it or not, I just got this working minutes before I read your review.
To get it running (for japanese, at least), launch system-config-services (called "services" under "server settings" in "system settings"), and make sure both IIim and canna are enabled and running (make sure the check box is checked, and look at the status to make sure there running. if their not, highlight each and click the 'start' button).
Load up a gtk app (all i've tested with - try gedit, nice and simple). right click in the text-entry area, then go to input methods, then select 'internet/intranet input method'
the panel applet should now be visible (it should stay visible, i think)
right click on it, and configure to your heart's content
just like kinput, you can hit ctrl+space to change languages, or (new) you can click on the panel applet.

check again
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:17 UTC

"YMMV, but I've found some glitches with the following KDE apps and I believe they're RedHat(9.0) only:"

i am not sure whether this is something to do with redhat but the repos specific to redhat have compatible rpms

check dag's repos for all these apps

http://dag.wieers.com/packages/

FC2 problems
by Felix on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:18 UTC

The CD-check has been broken on my computer since RH9 (i think) and all the (CD) installs complete without any problem.

In FC1 (and FC2) you can rightclick on a .iso file and choose Burn to CD (or something like that).

You can change the default mail application: Preferences -> Preferred Applications. Choose Mozilla Mail from the dropdown list. You can use the "Evolution" icon to start the mail client. I use it to change the default webbrowser to Epiphany.

The nice thing about this is that you can click on a mailto link and mozilla-mail is started instead of Evolution (so it works in every GNOME-app).

hostname is set by the initscripts - easily edited
by Anonymous on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:24 UTC

Just a note that /etc/sysconfig/network is where the hostname is set (in the format HOSTNAME=machinehostname) - just edit that and reboot. You may indeed want the hostname in a 127.0.0.1 line in /etc/hosts as well of course.

BEST WAY TO "MOVE" TO FC2:
by FooBarBlahBleh on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 21:30 UTC

Have two physical disks minimum in your box

Mount /home one

Mount / on another

Don't bother with an OS "upgrade", just reinstall.

Yes there is some time lost reinstalling some supplemental software, but you won't have a borked install.

Japanese Input
by HC on Wed 23rd Jun 2004 22:25 UTC

Inputting Japanese in FC2 works fine here. Just installed it during the installation by selecting both Japanese and English during the install. You can't switch languages unless you install the right programs during the install. The Japanese language inputting daemons load during boot just as they should. No daemons loading = no Japanese inputting.

re: deadfish man
by Maynard on Thu 24th Jun 2004 00:04 UTC

Juk, Amarok and the others do not play because Redhat insists on shipping Free/Open Source software only, which is not patent encumbered. mp3 playback and other video playback, except for mpeg 1, is not permissible using theri rules. its not a KDE problem on Redhat, but its a feature. Its trivial to add these capabilities to your installation.

RE: Input method switcher
by Ronald Schouten on Thu 24th Jun 2004 04:15 UTC

Thanks for those instructions. They were pretty accurate and got me typing in Japanese in no time. I noticed that the Gimlet preferences dialogue box was pretty unresponsive and buggy. When I get more time I'll contribute to Fedora's testing effort: http://apac.redhat.com/iiimftest/

RE: Hostname
by Bitterman on Thu 24th Jun 2004 04:24 UTC

"Just a note that /etc/sysconfig/network is where the hostname is set (in the format HOSTNAME=machinehostname) - just edit that and reboot. You may indeed want the hostname in a 127.0.0.1 line in /etc/hosts as well of course."

This is the reason for bootup being slow, likely because of sendmail it needs hostnames with a . in it much like mypc.localdomain instead of just mypc. http://www.redhat.com/archives/fedora-list/2003-November/msg06432.h...

seems moderately clueless for a 2 to 3 yr linux user
by mark on Thu 24th Jun 2004 04:26 UTC


I don't get this guy having so much problem with mozilla
mail. Right there clearly on the internet menu is
"Mozilla Mail". Seems pretty easy to me. Or why not run
mozilla and just select mail from pull down?

Mark

My experience has yet to be good with FC2
by cendrizzi on Thu 24th Jun 2004 05:10 UTC

I can't seem to get my box to connect to the internet (yes I've tried that net4-whatever setting where you have to turn it off.

Re: cAPTAIN^k
by ulrich on Thu 24th Jun 2004 08:12 UTC

then you should have readed that exchange-support for evolution is availlable through "ximian connector" now called "novell connector" or something like that.

search ximian/novell and you find it.
for me it works fine, except that its a bit slow if you have a huge mailbox cause connector uses OWA to do its job.

Can this guy read?
by Benjamin on Thu 24th Jun 2004 08:24 UTC

Hi

Well firstly he missed where it says to enter your Hostname - Stands out a mile, as long as you deselect DHCP (Which you need to do to set the hostname anyway).

Secondly he missed where you can set the mount point of partitions, on any disk (whether your formatting it or not). This adds it to fstab just fine, how else do you expect it to know where to put it?

Just my thoughts anyways...
Ben

Re: worked fine
by Nipson Anomhmata on Thu 24th Jun 2004 10:33 UTC

"Also, the media tester worked peachy on the DVD, so either it's different on the CD, or something specific to your system caused it to go out to lunch."

it seems to be specific to his system. media check worked fine here with 4 cds.


Media checked worked fine here too! :-)

FC2 speed and issues
by Martin on Thu 24th Jun 2004 11:03 UTC

I made a clean install on Celeron 1.8 / 256MB RAM, but the thing is soo slooow... of course I switched off all non critical services, but still, it takes too much time to boot.
"mozilla -mail" does work, but in the script (I think lauch-mail or so) parameters are stripped out, so only "mozilla" starts :-)))
NVidia driver included is very slow too - just try running tuxracer... not for my GeForce 2MX (but no problems with NVidia driver from NVidia, I hope there will be a way to use it in standard FC2 kernel).
And much more, I will not write it all. I was little disappointed with this upgrade.
Very nice distro though, it should try to speed up and debug all that "small errors".

Don't have to reboot after adding harddisc in fstab
by na on Thu 24th Jun 2004 12:33 UTC

After adding another harddisc in /etc/fstab (like /mnt/hdb1), you only have to run the following command as root "mount /mnt/hdb1". No need to reboot after changing /etc/fstab.

RE: not really
by hoyt@cavtel.net on Thu 24th Jun 2004 13:16 UTC

Want a non-Red Hat KDE? Go here -
http://kde-redhat.sourceforge.net/

Follow the simple steps listed on the page and use apt or yum to install it. You can still use the Bluecurve(tm) theme if you desire. There's not a monumental difference, but there are a few packages that RH/Fedora does not build and include. If you don't like the RH/Fedora implementation of Gnome, go here -
http://www.ximian.com/

And FC2 now comes with Xfce as an option. Or install any other GUI you want. After all, it's Linux; lots of choices for those who take the time to learn a little.

Re: re: deadfish man
by DeadFish Man on Thu 24th Jun 2004 13:56 UTC

Juk, Amarok and the others do not play because Redhat insists on shipping Free/Open Source software only, which is not patent encumbered. mp3 playback and other video playback, except for mpeg 1, is not permissible using theri rules. its not a KDE problem on Redhat, but its a feature. Its trivial to add these capabilities to your installation.

I do know that RedHat don't ship any audio and/or video codec of any sort with their distros, but like I said before, I know my way around RedHat (been using it since 1998 and already used to its quirks).

I've already installed every multimedia add-on available for RedHat/Fedora from the most recognized repositories (except that from Dag Wieers... Thanks for the tip!), but I still can't make it work. Like I said before, I am an apt user since the days of the betas that Conectiva released when they ported apt to the rpm world.

waste of cdroms
by smoke on Thu 24th Jun 2004 14:06 UTC

does anyone know if fedora supports a dist-upgrade like update mechanism? i never digged why i would repeatedly have to download EVERYTHING i dont even need on cdroms simply to update my system?
now i use debian, am happy with it and wonder whats all this fedora buzz is about ;)

upgrading samba
by Dennis on Thu 24th Jun 2004 15:05 UTC

I recently upgraded my fileserver (no X, via Yum) to FC2, and my Samba performance has gone through the floor. When I transfer files across the network, memory usage goes up and up until the transfer stalls and I have to kill the processes.

I'm going to revert to FC1 as soon as I have some free time, as I have been unable to find anyone who's reported a similar problem.

Network install
by Eric Garland on Thu 24th Jun 2004 15:30 UTC

I have to sympathize with the author when it comes to installing from CDís. I have had too many problems caused by bad CDs and itís a pain. Iíve given up and started installing over the network whenever possible. The good news is that I've found this much easier, faster and less prone to failure than installing from CD/DVD.

The best way to do this in my opinion is to download the DVD based distribution, loopback mount the DVD iso and copy/link the files to somewhere you can get to them on your local network. If you have a second computer on your LAN with about 2.5 gigs of drive space you can do this (skipping source rpms). There is an iso included on the DVD image (boot.iso) that will make a tiny bootable CD that does an install over the network. Itís great. It installs fast, you donít need to worry about CD-3 being scratched and having your install crash half way through. No CD swapping, you can put it in and walk away. No scratching $2 DVD-R's and ruining them forever. If you get to the GUI part of the install, youíre pretty much golden. It supports accessing the install files through NFS, FTP, HTTP and SMB (so you can even host the files on a Windows box.) I usually use HTTP and itís worked well for me so far.

@ Martin
by Finalzone on Thu 24th Jun 2004 16:02 UTC

NVidia driver included is very slow too - just try running tuxracer... not for my GeForce 2MX (but no problems with NVidia driver from NVidia, I hope there will be a way to use it in standard FC2 kernel).

Most Nvidia drivers found since Red Hat 8 were slow AFAIR because they are generic thus does not include 3D graphic accelerator. You should know this since you used to have Fedora Core 1.
Concerning Kernel 2.6.x found on Fedora Core 2, the team enabled 4KSTACK option that crashed Nvidia driver (it use 8KSTACKS). The latter is currently revised and should be out soon. Meanwhile, you can grab this kernel on http://www.linuxant.com/driverloader/wlan/full/downloads-fc2-kernel...

smoke: now i use debian, am happy with it and wonder whats all this fedora buzz is about ;)
No offense but posting this on specific topic like Fedora is unecessary. This only bring useless flamebait.

Solution to 'media check' and 'blue screen' problem
by pantz on Thu 24th Jun 2004 16:34 UTC

Hi Ronald

At work yesterday during an installation of FC2 I came across the same problem that you had with your installation. The install kept crashing around the media check stage and I even saw the same blue screen with junk characters all over the place. I tried installing over NFS, local CDROM, and I even tried all of the same things again with FC1. Nothing worked ...

So I finally thought maybe I should test the machines memory - BINGO!! - problem solved. I had a 256MB memory module that was faulty. I replaced it and the install went as smoothly as expected.

Now - how to test your memory? Boot from your first FC2 CD. At the prompt type 'memtest86'. You will be immediately thrown into the memtest86 application and it automatically starts testing your memory. The only important thing to look for is the 'Errors' column in the middle of the screen. If it says anything but '0' there - you have a faulty memory module. You can find out which one by removing modules one at a time and retesting ...

Good luck!

Did you read the paragraph on this part? Have you tried running Mozilla's Mail application from a freshly installed FC2?

There are two e-mail applications listed under Internet. There are two different icons which to me indicate two different applications. They both open Ximian's Evolution. This doesn't seem right. Yes, I can fix it with apt-get but this still seems like a bug to me.

CD check with md5sum
by Eisbaer on Thu 24th Jun 2004 18:26 UTC

You can check the integrity of the CDs by running md5sum on them.

# md5sum /dev/cdrom

Check the value returned against the supplied md5sums. If they match the cd is good.

http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/core/2/i386/iso/...

re email, software choice
by Anonymous on Fri 25th Jun 2004 17:10 UTC

here's a tip.

download control-center it implements a "preferred applications" menu entry (it's in "preferences" under kde - i think in the control panel under gnome). this allows you to set your:

- browser
- mail client
- editor
- terminal

the dag wieers yum/apt repository has rpms for firefox/tbird and the control-center preferred apps dialog offers these as choices once they're installed. once you've set these, your chosen apps come up pretty much any way you invoke them

works great.

re network install
by Anonymous on Fri 25th Jun 2004 17:22 UTC

it's actually even easier, actually:

- loopback mount the iso's
- export them thru nfs
- boot from first cd and type "linux askmethod" ("linux reisers askmethod" if you use reiser, as i do)
- tell it the nfs server's address

it's faster than install ing from cd's on my network.

see this for further detail:

http://fedoranews.org/dowen/nfsinstall/