Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 19th Sep 2004 20:00 UTC, submitted by UKBill
Slackware, Slax The Vector Linux team is proud to announce the release of VectorLinux 4.3. This small 326 MB download provides you a complete and fast desktop solution, even suitable for older hardware.
Order by: Score:
....
by Punk on Sun 19th Sep 2004 20:21 UTC

the webpage of this distribution is not very well maintained... i just lost any interest to try the distro, as i don't see any advantaged of using it instead of slackware

Mirror
by Menno Duursma on Sun 19th Sep 2004 20:34 UTC

Tis much faster for me, then main (ibiblio) server for me:
ftp://ftp.nluug.nl/pub/metalab/distributions/vectorlinux/veclinux-...

in defense of Vector
by xmp on Sun 19th Sep 2004 20:49 UTC

the webpage of this distribution is not very well maintained...

IMHO, it's a simple distro and doesn't need a lot of documentation. The forums are able to field a lot of newbie questions also.

i just lost any interest to try the distro, as i don't see any advantaged of using it instead of slackware

I had a CD problem on one machine and Vector was easier to install (from veclinux.bz2) than Slackware. Also the Slackware boot floppy is best made in *nix, while the Vector floppies are traditional image files.

Functionally, it's very similar to Slackware in daily use. The window manager selector is a bit cheesy, so I just boot straight into TWM or IceWM. The Software Plaza is a cool idea, but not much is available in 4.0 (the last Vector I've used). I do like the VASM which centralizes basic configuration.

I currently run Slackware on the server, and Vector on the desktop. Either is a competent distro, with slightly different target audiences.

@Punk
by Menno Duursma on Sun 19th Sep 2004 21:03 UTC

Well, AFAIK http://slackware.com isn'd updated all that often either. Not that i care though, they - put out a great distro - are quick to provide security patches ...

ATM i have http://routerlinux.com on my gateway, http://delilinux.berlios.de/ on my laptop and Slacware X on my desktop. (Just what thier good at - although Slack makes a fine server as well, ofcource).

I'll try Vector on some unused p233mmx first, and if it's not slow to the point of being unbareable, probably, upgrade a neigbours 'ol box with it. Rather then tweak away at some other disto.

Default wallpaper
by Pawel Foremski on Sun 19th Sep 2004 21:10 UTC

Look at the screenshots. Isn't this wallpaper just plain ugly? ;) PP

Maybe Buffalo linux gives you more?
by Anonymous Penguin on Sun 19th Sep 2004 21:21 UTC

Buffalo linux is also based on Slackware and Vector.
Very conveniently, it also comes with 'commercial' software (Real Player, Acrobar Reader...) included.
Besides, new releases are very frequent.
Only minus: it used to be very buggy. However I haven't tried the last few releases.

lightweight
by xmp on Sun 19th Sep 2004 21:33 UTC

I'll try Vector on some unused p233mmx first, and if it's not slow to the point of being unbareable, probably, upgrade a neigbours 'ol box with it. Rather then tweak away at some other disto.

I have Vector 4.0 on an 100 mhz / 64 meg / 1 gig drive. I run TWM or IceWM. It runs ok, but I may try Deli linux on that machine.

Things like OpenOffice and Mozilla may be too heavy.

(1) The first version of VectorLinux I used could be installed from a FAT32-partition. This was great lacking a cdwriter. (2) Before Slackware 10 I had to compile a kernel to get sound - VectorLinux always was a nicely rearranged Desktop-Slackware. (3) Only the VectorLinux SOHO-version came with KDE while the normal VL was very light, fast and simple to configure (someone mentioned VASM already).

Things are changing with this release as Slackware 10 gets more and more competitive (works like perfectly preconfigured 'out of the box'). The new VectorLinux also is no longer built by two or three individuals - it is now a community-built distribution. This (really friendly) community seems to be rapidly growing. In my opinion one of the greatest features of VL are the forums. They always helped me within hours or less. And I am not affiliated with the project in any way.

bigger ISO
by emf on Sun 19th Sep 2004 23:17 UTC

(1) The first version of VectorLinux I used could be installed from a FAT32-partition. This was great lacking a cdwriter.

Yes. IIRC you just copy over the kernels and veclinux.bz2. This worked great when my CDROM started acting flaky. In fairness to Slackware there are NFS and unofficial FTP installs. Also most distros will allow mounting from a loop device. The smaller Vec ISO is also easier for dialup users.

(3) Only the VectorLinux SOHO-version came with KDE while the normal VL was very light, fast and simple to configure

I think they would like people to purchase the CD's, which should include KDE and/or Gnome. I used the regular (non SOHO) ISO and used swaret to get KDE.

The ISO's are getting fat. Vec 4.0 was 223 meg, and 4.3 is 325 meg.

Re: emf
by CaptainPinko on Mon 20th Sep 2004 01:00 UTC

personally I perfer "fat isos". I have a crappy connection and I hate waiting for a downlaod. this way it only sucks once. personally the fattest distro for me is Debian because to use it i have to download all 7 CDs because I never know what I will need later. I like having everything available and on hand.

Maybe the answer is too provide two ISOs, one lean and with all the fixings?

RE: Re: emf
by Anonymous on Mon 20th Sep 2004 01:40 UTC

personally the fattest distro for me is Debian because to use it i have to download all 7 CDs because I never know what I will need later.

For installing Debian you should try the netinst CD image (about 112 megs), and then use it to download only the packages you want. There may be some apps even in a small and compact distro like Vector that you don't want or need (do you really need all them three WMs?) but in Debian it is possible to install a GNU/Linux system without downloading ANY unnecessary apps.

RE: Re: emf
by Anonymous on Mon 20th Sep 2004 01:44 UTC

Oh, sorry. I didn't realize at first that you WANT to download as many unnecessary packages as you can. Well, have it your way. ;-)

re. Debian netinst
by johnMG on Mon 20th Sep 2004 03:23 UTC

For installing Debian you should try the netinst CD image (about 112 megs)

I actually just tried the current Sarge netinst image yesterday. I burned myself an image to CD at work and brought the CD home to give it a whirl. I'm on dialup at home, and hadn't configured my connection yet when the installer asked me where I wanted to install from. I told it to use the CD, but it insisted on trying to connect to the net anyway -- in effect, locking up the installation.

I rebooted with my Slackware 10 CD and went back to Slack. Interestingly enough, I couldn't get my dialup to work with Slack9 nor Slack10 (it *had* worked for me running Debian and RH9 in the past). If dialup would work for me with VL, I might give it a try...

I like distros that don't automatically assume that you're either on a LAN or else have a broadband connection to the net. A lot of us are still only on dialup.

RE: re. Debian netinst
by Anonymous on Mon 20th Sep 2004 03:48 UTC

With Debian netinst you could have backed up to the main menu, continued installing the base system from CD, and after installation configured your net connection with pppconfig.

But Vector is certainly worth trying out, too. I've had some earlier release of Vector installed on an old computer (pentium 100MHz, 96Mb RAM) and it was one of the very few distros that worked with that hardware. Too bad some of the apps were buggy at that time and there weren't available in Vector some of the apps that I wanted.

BTW, does Vector 4.3 come with some easy firewall setup program or script?

tips
by Anonymous on Mon 20th Sep 2004 08:25 UTC

Vector Linux should upgrade to fluxbox 0.9.10+ since previous versions have the uglist toolbar. Also I would include firefox in as well. Supprised you went with Roxfiler+fluxbox, very catchy. Good Job.

doh!
by girtherobot on Mon 20th Sep 2004 15:21 UTC

...and I just installed debian on an old 200Mhz this weekend! If you have plenty of RAM (128), Gnome is actually usable on slow machines.

vector
by xmp on Mon 20th Sep 2004 20:52 UTC

I actually just tried the current Sarge netinst image yesterday.

I had tried a very small debian ISO in 2003, hoping that it would work with dialup and PPPD. Unfortunately it needed Ethernet and broadband at that time.

Interestingly enough, I couldn't get my dialup to work with Slack9 nor Slack10 (it *had* worked for me running Debian and RH9 in the past). If dialup would work for me with VL, I might give it a try...

There was a GKdial icon on the Vec 4.0 desktop. It works quite well.

BTW, does Vector 4.3 come with some easy firewall setup program or script?

Services disabling is almost as good as firewalling. An exploit or trojan could still open a port though.

Too bad some of the apps were buggy at that time and there weren't available in Vector some of the apps that I wanted.

Swaret works great for minor upgrades and adding packages.

I'm looking forward to trying 4.3.