Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 14th Nov 2004 22:10 UTC, submitted by Johan Thelin
Qt The Independent Qt Tutorial has been updated with a brand new chapter on lists, trees and tables. The visual components are very common in todays applications and complements the existing chapters well. Also from digitalfanatics, a widget gallery, helping you to pick the right widget with screenshots and code examples when it is hard to choose.
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v Tell my why...
by sLiCeR on Sun 14th Nov 2004 23:45 UTC
I like it!
by Emil Oppeln-Bronikowski on Mon 15th Nov 2004 05:53 UTC

I like it, it's good as an exampledriven overview of QT. Keep up good job!

Widget Guide
by CaptainPinko on Mon 15th Nov 2004 06:27 UTC

I've been looking for this since I first picked up Qt/C++. Likewise, for anyone starting Swing/Java : http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/components/componen... .

v boost
by boost on Mon 15th Nov 2004 13:17 UTC
Qt Rulez
by Jarek Pelczar on Mon 15th Nov 2004 14:29 UTC

I started learning Qt to make some project and I think that Qt is the best. It has big set of extremelly useful classes.

qt's widgets are years behind the times
by been there done that on Mon 15th Nov 2004 20:23 UTC

Trolltech has put very little effort into their widgets. They don't even support wordwrap -- either at all in the case of the QListView -- or properly, in the case of the QTable.

Their layout managers don't work and their designer, Qt Designer, does not do code re-gen. So you can't use the code it generates.

Qt4 looks like uber-techno stuff all the while Windows just marches along on the strength of high-quality widgets.

Now it could be Qt5 will use all the uber-techno stuff in Qt4 and be a strong C++ toolkit.

Of course with Trolltech's Java-love (all their new API's are modeled on Java because I think all the good C++ coders left Trolltech), I doubt it. Very much doubt it.

Re: qt's widgets are years behind the times
by David on Mon 15th Nov 2004 20:37 UTC

Trolltech has put very little effort into their widgets. They don't even support wordwrap -- either at all in the case of the QListView -- or properly, in the case of the QTable.

Clearly not true, but hey.

Their layout managers don't work

For anyone who's used it, again, clearly not true. When you know what layout management is, make a sensible statement about it but it seems that you cannot use it.

So you can't use the code it generates.

Wow, really?

Qt4 looks like uber-techno stuff all the while Windows just marches along on the strength of high-quality widgets.

As someone who is using .Net and has seen someone spend a full four days trying to get .Net to perform layout management and resizing properly (I can say with much confidence that it can't do it for toffee) on something that should have been a ten minute job, I find that pretty laughable. If you think Windows development involves using high quality widgets then you're obviously not using it.

Of course with Trolltech's Java-love (all their new API's are modeled on Java because I think all the good C++ coders left Trolltech), I doubt it.

I for one am glad Qt is quite clearly not modelled on Java. In terms of GUI development there are those of us who like to get things done and have something maintainable.

Back to the Article
by David on Mon 15th Nov 2004 21:20 UTC

That's quite a neat and simple summary of using different views, and it's really quite nice that you can do all that really simply. When you're trying to portray data there's always better ways you could be doing it and helpful pointers you can give users to make it more usable and more consistent. Of course, you have to be careful with all this power usability-wise....

After being initially pretty sceptical of Interview I'm starting to warm to it having read more about it. It's quite easy to forget how tied to your interface your data sometimes becomes, almost unwittingly, and that becomes apparent when you try to give different views of the same data in different applications. If they don't make it too difficult to work with then it will be a very good feature. If you have many applications that are able to view the same data and you use common components to do it, it will be very nice to work with.

Interview should also have a positive knock-on effect in being able to contribute to sensible, sane and centralised validation. The piece on Input Validation itself was pretty interesting and pretty easy to do. Visual Basic anyone?

QWT was also a good piece, and you're going to find this kind of stuff pretty difficult to do in a sane and maintainable manner with anything else - if not impossible.

The thing Qt needs next is good distributed computing support at its heart and the possibility of using higher level languages (fully supported though). I'm quite surprised how easy C++ is to use with Qt though.

v re: david
by been there done that on Tue 16th Nov 2004 00:50 UTC