posted by Laurence on Sat 16th Jan 2010 15:09
Conversations ESXi doesn't meet my requirements (long story - dont ask) so i basically need a Linux distro that's easy to maintain, lower foot-print, 64bit and VERY stable.

I might just settle for Slackware, but if theres something better then i'm all ears.
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Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Sat 16th Jan 2010 16:04 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

actually OpenSUSE looks like it might be better suited....

Reply Score: 2

Gentoo..
by bert64 on Sat 16th Jan 2010 19:58 UTC
bert64
Member since:
2007-04-23

I would suggest Gentoo, because it has good packages for vmware server that you can emerge...

Do you need vmware server, or would another technology work? Proxmox is good, and uses KVM but will obviously require a processor which supports hardware virtualization...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Gentoo..
by Laurence on Sun 17th Jan 2010 02:07 in reply to "Gentoo.."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I would suggest Gentoo, because it has good packages for vmware server that you can emerge...

Do you need vmware server, or would another technology work? Proxmox is good, and uses KVM but will obviously require a processor which supports hardware virtualization...


I'm not too fussed about the virtulisation technology so long as it's stable (ran VBox for a while but it really wasn't reliable for a production server).
The only real criteria is that the OS is free (can't afford RHEL (and the lark) licences).

My CPU is AMD64 so has AMDs virt extensions.

---

Thanks for the suggestion. Installed OpenSUSE earlier so going to see how I get on with that (plus VMWare). But I may well fall back on your recommendation ;)

Reply Score: 2

Ubuntu Server
by Soulbender on Sun 17th Jan 2010 06:43 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

I used to run VMWare Server on Ubuntu Server and it worked very well.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Ubuntu Server
by Laurence on Sun 17th Jan 2010 09:47 in reply to "Ubuntu Server"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I did consider that but I've never really been a great fan of Ubuntu (except for Xubuntu which I run my media centres on).

Is the server range any good then?

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ubuntu Server
by Laurence on Sun 17th Jan 2010 16:15 in reply to "RE: Ubuntu Server"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I've now given up on OpenSUSE - it's visualisation tools aren't really complete (not even with the built in xen support).

It feels like it's nearly there - but for now I'll try VMWare in Ubuntu Studio.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Ubuntu Server
by Soulbender on Mon 18th Jan 2010 04:10 in reply to "RE: Ubuntu Server"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Depends on what your metrics are for "good" but I do like that it is very cut down and only comes with the bare essentials.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Mon 18th Jan 2010 15:28 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

I can't get VMWare to compile for Ubuntu either. The same error about the kernel as with OpenSUSE.

I'm definitly using a 64bit version of VMware Server as well a 64bit version of Linux.
I'm at a loss now as VBox lacks features I need (and I've been less than impressed with it's stability over the years too), VMware can't even compile and Xen throws all sorts of random errors (but at least it starts the virtual machine!) as well as being a complete PITA to administrate.

I'm seriously running short of good virtulisation suites.....

Might give Proxmox a try before going back to OpenSUSE and Xen (which I've had the most success with thus far)

Reply Score: 2

debian (as always)
by l3v1 on Mon 1st Feb 2010 09:32 UTC
l3v1
Member since:
2005-07-06

My choice was a debian base install then adding vmware, and be done with it. Didn't find any reason to use anything else yet.

Reply Score: 2