Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 22nd Mar 2006 18:08 UTC
General Development "Newer software does try to be sexier by doing flashy things such as the talking paperclip. This causes a tendency for the software to bloat to the point of saturation, i.e. until it performs at barely acceptable speeds. But application programming seems to get worse with faster processors. Even with more memory, faster disks and multiple CPUs, your average web application runs slower. Is it possible that the faster hardware has made us worse programmers?"
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Just wanna tame things...
by Kochise on Thu 23rd Mar 2006 11:02 UTC
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

I'm a legacy assembler and embedded coder who, due to some reasons, had to 'convert' himself to Windows. I used to code on ARM and 68K architechtures, and shifting on x86 was a pain. I never experienced memory segmentation before, and I can tell it's a no-go. Hopefully Intel copied the Motorola's flat memory concept of its 68K family in their 386+ CPU. Good...

What puzzle me the most is seing all these human/coder resources for 40+ years still beating themselves with strings and so. I'm currently fighting against Microsoft's new security policy in Windows Mobile 5 platform, like if they just discovered what coding security is. Note they released many PDA devices stuck to a QVGA 240x320 resolution, with no API for higher resolutions, like if things would stay this way forever, and unable to learn from their own desktop experience.

So it's easy to bash the author of the article for telling already known truth. But just admit YOU are in fault, too lazy to code better by yourself, or under the dictatorship of a manager/CTO that was offered a new technology supposively able to BOOST his peer's productivity, making him shine a great profit interest at the end of the year.

I'm an average-joe-coder that won't touch any bill from any profit, only stock holders' will. So what's my interest in the process ? Ease myself coding ? Make my boss earning more money ? For the fun of it ?

For my personal projects, I try to code wiser, as I know it's done not for profit and I will have to maintain the stuff later. In a coding staff, you don't really care about the poor novice that will have to maintain your code in some years, as a job evaluation or project thesis.

Kochise

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