Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Aug 2007 17:28 UTC, submitted by vondur
Linux "Don't expect to see key features of OpenSolaris showing up in the Linux kernel," said a top Linux maintainer. At his LinuxWorld opening keynote, Andrew Morton made it very clear that the appointment of former OSDL CTO and Debian co-founder Ian Murdock to Sun's OS platforms organization will not translate into a merging between the open source version of Solaris Unix with Linux. He didn't mince words. "It's a great shame that OpenSolaris still exists. They should have killed it," said Morton, addressing one attendee's question about the possibility of Solaris' most notable features being integrated into the kernel. "It's a disappointment and a mistake by Sun." Morton said none of those features - Zones, ZFS, DTrace - will end up in the Linux kernel because Sun refuses to adopt the GPL.
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Here's the bottom line
by richardstevenhack on Fri 10th Aug 2007 20:11 UTC
richardstevenhack
Member since:
2006-12-30

ALL of the proprietary UNIX companies - IBM, HP, Sun - should have killed their proprietary UNIXes ten years ago and donated their entire source code to Linux.

Had they done that, Linux would be MILES ahead of Windows today and those companies - and Linux - would be competing much better with Microsoft today.

Instead they all - including Sun - wanted to keep their "differentiation" strategies, resulting in Windows Server taking over a big chunk of the server market and continuing to advanced at the cost of those proprietary UNIXes and, to a lesser degree since Linux is also advancing well, Linux.

That is undoubtedly why Morton said what he said - if not, it should be his reason.

Sun has been too little, too late, all along with regards to open sourcing Java and their OS. HP and IBM still don't get it at all. NO one company can successfully compete with Microsoft. Only OSS can IF they get the support of Microsoft's competitors.

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