Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Nov 2007 21:22 UTC, submitted by irbis
Window Managers "Linux has proven amazingly flexible: after nearly 10 years of use, I'm still impressed by how the Linux operating system does exactly what I want on any type of hardware. Desktop customization is no exception; from the ultra-modern KDE and GNOME window managers to with the likes of Fluxbox and AfterStep, there's a Linux desktop to suit everyone."
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RE: "ultra-modern"?
by Sophotect on Tue 20th Nov 2007 07:56 UTC in reply to ""ultra-modern"?"
Sophotect
Member since:
2006-04-26

What is "windowslike" about this?
Some pictures to show off the difference to this reocurring theme, while infusing myself with some morningcoffee and feeling the urge to ramble against that :-)
General desktop, rarely seen because usually it is covered by running applications:
http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/2814/snapshot1kp7.png
The Browser:
http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/1/snapshot2af8.png
Some older filemanagement showoff:
http://img244.imageshack.us/img244/5422/bildschirmphoto1kn3.png
And just in case...what is wrong about being like something which is known to most people having to use computers, and therefore known how to handle it almost immediately?
I have tried many of the alternatives, and been stuck in KDE-Country, because for me, overall it gives the best "bang for the buck". Whereas "buck" is not right exactly, since it is free to download in whichever distribution you are using, it is just a matter of time and taste customising it to your needs. Once you have done that it flies, depending on which hardware you are running it, and which bells and whistles you have switched on or off. But, it scales down very well to something as "lowly" as a Pentium III running at 1GHz with onboard i815 VGA and 512MB Ram. With scaling down well i mean something which is not visible by watching screenshots, imagine a opening a folder with hundreds of files in it, showing the generated file previews in fractions of a second. Imagine that while playing music with the oh so bloated Amarok, or watching a video in f.e. KMPlayer while doing that. Stuttering ? Err, no, why should it? And this "why should it" i have found in no other combination of ease of use and general usability. Now imagine how this combination flies on actual hardware ;->
/endrant

Edited 2007-11-20 08:05

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