Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Feb 2008 21:06 UTC
SCO, Caldera, Unixware Having almost disappeared completely late last year, SCO says it has been resuscitated by a new financing plan. Under the terms of the deal, Stephen Norris Capital Partners and "its partners from the Middle East" will supply up to $100 million, enabling SCO to reorganize and launch a new series of products. SNCP will gain a controlling interest in the company, and take it private, allowing it to slip out of Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Update: As part of the reorganisation, Darl McBride will be let go. Buried in the proposed MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) between Unix vendor and Linux litigator SCO and SNCP is the note that "upon the effective date of the Proposed Plan of Reorganization, the existing CEO of the Company, Darl McBride, will resign immediately."
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Wait and see
by sbergman27 on Thu 14th Feb 2008 22:12 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

SCO has been pretty well disarmed by the court. They may really have no option but to try to make it with a legigimate business. Or (Where's Waldo? Where's Waldo?) maybe Microsoft thought there was still enough FUD value remaining to justify sinking, or persuading someone else to sink, $100M more into them. I doubt it, though. They are still under the consent decree in the US for another couple of years. The EU has taken notice of them. And you can bet that other governments around the world have taken note of the EU's success. And even the piddly bit of success that the US has had. Balmer has clearly proclaimed that he considers Linux to be Microsoft's top competitor. Can they really risk, at this point, to be caught red handed participating in an illegal scheme to destabilize their top competitor?

Many here may not be aware that SCO and Caldera both had pretty solid businesses not that many years ago. Before there *was* a Linux, SCO was the knight in shining armor representing Unix in the land of x86. Yeah, they made a lot of mistakes back then, like all the Unix vendors did.

But IMO, if the new owners jettisoned Darl and the gang, and made a go of it in a legitimate way, it would give me the warm fuzzies. Because before all this litigious crap started, and before Linux grew up in the late 90's, SCO was my hero.

Edited 2008-02-14 22:24 UTC

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