Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 1st Mar 2009 17:26 UTC, submitted by kaiwai
Hardware, Embedded Systems Long-time OSNews reader Kaiwai has written down his experiences with his Acer Aspire One, Linux, and Windows. He concludes: "After a hectic few weeks trying to get Linux to work, I am back to square one again - a netbook running Windows XP SP3 as it was provided by Acer when I purchased it. I gave three different distributions a chance to prove themselves. I expected all three distributions to wipe the floor with Windows XP - after all, these are the latest and greatest distributions the Linux world have to offer. There has been at least 7 years since the release of Windows XP for Linux to catch up to Windows XP and from my experience with Linux on this said device - it has failed to step up to the plate when it was needed."
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RE[3]: Sadly, similar experience
by ReeBop on Mon 2nd Mar 2009 23:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Sadly, similar experience"
ReeBop
Member since:
2009-03-01

I agree with your points. I wanted to add a perspective through from my 30 years in computing though. I still remember clearly the DOS wars of the late 80's and early 90's between DR-DOS and MS-DOS. I used DR-DOS just because of the way in easily handled expanded (with a 286 memory card) or extended memory. Foxpro, dBase III+ and Paradox ran great on it. Windows 286 didn't do what I wanted, Windows 3.0 was close (grrr...UAEs) then Windows 3.1 seemed to get it right (for the early 90's). The problem was, Microsoft deliberately made Windows 3.1 not work in DR-DOS; a DOS that was superior to MS-DOS. They also forced agreements on OEMs that if they installed DR-DOS (and later, OS/2 as well), the OEM still owed Microsoft licensing money for each computer sold.

Of course, there is much more to the story than that but using their products brings back that bad memory of using the products from a company that would do such things. Yes, they were convicted in 2000 but let's face it, they were let off the hook by the previous administration. Actions such as this is what drove me to first, the OS/2 world, then to SLS and the Linux world. I moved then to Slackware, then RedHat 3.0.3 and Caldera. I use Fedora, CentOS and Mandriva now and will probably experiment with Puppy. I do maintain bootable Vista, XP and Win98SE (even OS/2 4.5 and DR-DOS) partitions however. I still believe that Microsoft leverages monopolistic power over the industry to this day. Until I see computer systems widely available in big box stores that boot into GNOME, KDE, XFCE or any other desktop envirionment included in a Linux or BSD-based distribution, I will continue to feel that way.

Off topic, I've read this site for 10+ years and it took an article like this to finally make me register and post. Funny...

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