Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Mar 2009 22:34 UTC
Gnome The GNOME team has released GNOME 2.26, the latest release in the 2.x release branch. As everyone knows, GNOME is a multi-platform open source desktop environment. The 2.26 release continues GNOME's policy of incremental updates to a stable base, and as such, it comes packed with a boatload of new features.
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RE[6]: Great Release!
by darknexus on Sun 22nd Mar 2009 23:25 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Great Release!"
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

"Inferior," is very subjective. Honestly, you complain about GNOME fanboys, but it takes a fanboy to know one I suppose. Look at the crap you're spouting out and realize you're simply the same as they are, you're just on the other side of the fence.
What is inferior to you may not be inferior to me. For my purposes, for example, KDE is very clearly inferior to GNOME. Stop trying to force your view on others. It won't work, you'll inevitably piss people off, and then you'll be pissed off and repeat the cycle. KDE, GNOME, whatever. Let's just have all of them continue to thrive, competition is nothing but good, and agreement will never be reached on a topic as subjective as this.
I did not say visual improvements were not important. But there's a point when it goes beyond improvement and simply becomes a toy, of no real practical purpose. What, exactly, does a spinning cube bring to the desktop experience, other than the five seconds it takes to go wow, ok that was cool now what? Maybe I'm just jaded and sick of every Linux fanboy zealot pointing out the spinning cubes as a productive feature. Some of the visuals are features, others very clearly are just eye candy. Further, I wouldn't say CDE died because of lack of visual effects, it died because at the time it wasn't usually practical for the average home user to run UNIX, if they even knew what UNIX was or cared. CDE fell off, in short, when better desktops like GNOME and KDE came on the scene and replaced it, they were more open and had new ideas, thus attracting a wider community around them.

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