Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Mar 2009 23:34 UTC
Amiga & AROS Despite the recent emergence of several new ways to actually run AmigaOS 4.0, the supply of machines is still extremely small, and not very future proof. As such, one of the most recurring questions within the Amiga community is why don't they port the darn thing to x86?
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RE: Comment by MORB
by silix on Fri 27th Mar 2009 14:55 UTC in reply to "Comment by MORB"
silix
Member since:
2006-03-01

There's not a single useful concept left in that technology that hasn't been superseded by something equivalent or better in modern OSes.


concept: "settling for a unified versatile container file format"
implementation: the IFF chunk based format that could be used for graphics, audio, document, or iirc executable files
superseded by: the current plethora of completely independent formats each with their own (and sometimes not efficient) parsing formats

concept: "allow applications open or read files types (be they audio, image, document, or other files) they may not natively know, granted application can query the system to do it"
implementation: the centralized DataType filters, available to all applications once installed
currently replaced by: on BeOS / HaikuOS, Translators; on Windows, codecs (that in turn only cover the needs for multimedia files and streams) and, to a certain extents, browser plugins; on *nix, nothing

concept: "when changing some settings (Preferences) let the user try alternate values without altering the saved one"
implementation: "Use" option to use apply the new value only for the current session (iirc saving the setting to the RamDisk instead of permanent storage) and be reassured that even if things got messed up, they'd be back to normal on restart - and "Revert" companion option that restored the last saved value in case of necessity
superseded by: the current ubiquitous, less useful and flexible "Apply" paradigm

but i'm sure there's much more...

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