Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Apr 2009 23:44 UTC, submitted by google_ninja
Windows It's something lots of people here on OSNews have been waiting for. It's something we've talked about, something we've theorised about, and something we've declared as the future for Windows' backwards compatibility - and now it's here, and official. Over a month ago, Microsoft bloggers Rafael Rivera and Paul Thurrott have been briefed by Microsoft on a technology for Windows 7 called Windows XP Mode. Available as a free download for Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate users, it's a fully integrated and licensed copy of Windows XP SP3 in a VirtualPC-based environment, with full "coherence" support. In other words, it's Microsoft's variant of Apple's Classic environment, and it's coming to Windows 7, for free. Near-instant update: The Windows 7 RC will indeed be available publicly on May 5. TechNet/MSDN will get it April 30.
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This is a really bad solution.
by Kebabbert on Tue 28th Apr 2009 12:11 UTC
Kebabbert
Member since:
2007-07-27

I dont agree with this solution for achieving backwards compatibility. In my opinion it is a really bad solution. Why is is bad? It doesnt scale. It is no long term solution, the problem of achieving good backwards compatibility persist.

In Windows 10, will there be a virtual machine for WinXP, Vista, Win7, Win8 and Win9? Imagine how much RAM and CPU and disk space all these virtualized Operating systems will require. The fact that there is WinXP virtualized inside Win7 is a testimony MS can not get Win7 backwards compatibile. They have to cheat by inserting a whole WinXP inside Win7. That is a BAD thing. Always, new versions of Windows breaks compatiility; Vista breaks WinXP, WinXP breaks Win2000, etc. MS is very bad at backwards compatibility, as evidenced by Word2003 inability to create Word97 files, it is black magic to MS too!
http://lists.kde.org/?l=koffice&m=101502075222664&w=2



In my opinion, the best solution is to keep backwards compatibility and still develop the OS. It can be done: SUN _guarantees_ binary backwards compatibility back to Solaris v2.6. And now Solaris is v5.10. And the development of Solaris is amazing; ZFS, DTrace, Zones, etc. This way you keep the OS slim and clean and efficient.

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