Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Jul 2009 09:50 UTC, submitted by kragil
Debian and its clones Most mainstream distributions, like Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mandriva, have already adopted a time-based release schedule, meaning that releases are not done on a feature basis, but according to a pre-determined time schedule. The Debian project has announced that it has adopted a time-based release schedule too.
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Release dates and times
by mbit on Wed 29th Jul 2009 22:20 UTC
mbit
Member since:
2009-07-29

Let's take a look at the Debian release dates and times so far:
Debian 1.0 - never officially released
Debian 1.1 - 1996-06-17
Debian 1.2 - 1996-12-12 - 6 months
Debian 1.3 - 1997-06-05 - 6 months
Debian 2.0 - 1998-07-24 - 13 months (25 months since Debian 1.1)
Debian 2.1 - 1999-03-09 - 8 months
Debian 2.2 - 2000-08-15 - 17 months (25 months since Debian 2.0)
Debian 3.0 - 2002-07-19 - 23 months
Debian 3.1 - 2005-06-06 - 35 months
Debian 4.0 - 2007-04-08 - 22 months
Debian 5.0 - 2009-02-14 - 22 months

It seems like a 24 months freeze cycle for major releases is what
they have been going for since the beginning and finally deciding
on it seems like the natural thing to do.

Looking at things in this light shows this decision won't
rock the Debian boat and affect stability in any way.
Rowing the boat will just become more synchronized.

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