Linked by David Adams on Tue 29th Sep 2009 14:53 UTC
In the News Forbes has an interesting article that attempts to push Crowdsourcing off its pedestal by pointing out that "crowds" don't actually invent or create anything; individuals do. What the crowdsourcing phenomenon does is put an opportunity in front of a large number of people, some of whom may be uniquely suited to solve a particular problem or achieve a particular goal. The article goes on to discuss Open Source Software, and points out that Open Source's success isn't because of crowds of anonymous people, but the largely the efforts of identifiable virtuosos.
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He's right, but its not news to anyone
by Praxis on Tue 29th Sep 2009 21:04 UTC
Praxis
Member since:
2009-09-17

In general I think he is right that people have been increasingly attributing to the 'crowd' some sort the mythical powers, same as business seem to be hoping the coming of the 'cloud' will solve all their problems. Its really a simple case of buzz words taking on a life of their own. But among the people who know what they are talking about this is all obvious. This is not to say that more eyes or brains are ever bad, but one committed individual will have a much larger contribution to a project than almost any number of commits by random contributers. And those committed individuals should be given not respect they deserve and not have their role delegated to supporting actor.

In short, crowdsourcing is a great method of getting the attention of the committed individuals who actually get things done, and credit should be given where it is due.

Edited 2009-09-29 21:05 UTC

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