Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Jan 2010 11:37 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems It's funny how while software changes so fast, and many hardware components evolve at ridiculously fast paces (processors, memory, hard drives), the keyboard has remained largely unchanged over the years - until recently, that is. Even Lenovo has now buckled under the pressure, switching to a chiclet-style keyboard for ThinkPads - while also removing the SysReq key.
Permalink for comment 404009
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Comment by palraabjerg
by palraabjerg on Thu 14th Jan 2010 13:14 UTC
palraabjerg
Member since:
2010-01-14

It's funny how while software changes so fast, and many hardware components evolve at ridiculously fast paces (processors, memory, hard drives), the keyboard has remained largely unchanged over the years - until recently, that is.

Oh yes. It still amazes me how ingrained keyboards are in habit and tradition. And this goes for nearly every single keyboard in production today. And forget an essentially minor tweak like the SysReq key...
Do any of you guys know exactly why the rows of a keyboard are non-aligned? In fact, not a single of the four main rows have the exact same alignment.
As far as I can make out, typewriters did this purely to make space for the little rods that go from each key to the main typewriter mechanics.

If you want a sensible keyboard design that actually take comfort and ergonomics into account (instead of tweaking mindlessly on a design that makes no sense in the age of electronic keyboards), the only two manufacturers I know of are Kinesis and Maltron. Maltron even has examples of how to create a more sensible flat keyboard. And I so wish someone would at least make the attempt to adapt such a design to a laptop.

Reply Score: 1