Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Jan 2010 23:06 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "The Ubuntu development community announced today the availability of Ubuntu 10.04 alpha 2, a new prerelease of the next major version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution. This alpha is the first Ubuntu release to completely omit HAL, a Linux hardware abstraction layer that is being deprecated in favor of DeviceKit."
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RE: Deprecation
by Ed W. Cogburn on Sat 16th Jan 2010 16:45 UTC in reply to "Deprecation"
Ed W. Cogburn
Member since:
2009-07-24

we no sooner get one subsystem that works reasonably well when the wheel is re-invented yet again.


That's called learning from your mistakes, and trying to do things 'better'.

HAL had problems, but they weren't *really* noticed until people started to use it for lots of things it wasn't originally designed to handle, aka. 'feature creep' (and using XML for the config files didn't help any).

The people behind the *kits and u* packages are the same ones that were behind HAL, they aren't inventing a new wheel (where 'wheel' here refers to the general idea/function of the software), just refining the old one (different API because the old one was, in hindsight, broken, and making it more modular, breaking the old monolithic package into smaller more flexible pieces). HAL was simply trying to do too much.

Is it any wonder that most commercial software developers don't target it?


Most software apps wouldn't need to interact directly with HAL. They'd use DE hooks, or an xplatform lib, rather than talk to HAL directly. I don't think thats really significant.

They don't target Linux because it doesn't have much of any market share. Over the years, Windows has had various warts and ugliness that coders targeting it had to deal with, but that didn't stop them, they went to all that trouble anyway because of Windows's market share.

It always boils down to just the size of the market...

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