Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Feb 2010 13:23 UTC, submitted by kragil
Graphics, User Interfaces You may remember that back in November last year, I wrote about the lack of a decent Paint.NET-like application for Linux (or, more specifically, for Gtk+ distributions, since Qt has Krita). As it turns out, this compelled Novell employee Jonathan Pobst to code a Paint.NET clone in Gtk+ using Cairo. Version 0.1 is here, and it's remarkably advanced for something so young.
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RE: Finally!
by DeadFishMan on Mon 8th Feb 2010 21:08 UTC in reply to "Finally!"
DeadFishMan
Member since:
2006-01-09

Finally! A lightweight painting program that can be used to make simple modifications instead of opening gimp.

And I don't care if he "copied" paint.NET. Everybody copies everybody in this industry. In fact, the different civilisations copied one another. "Greece copied from Egypt, The Roman empire copied from Greece..."


I don't get what is so great about these "simplified" image editors that are appearing on GNOME lately. For the kind of changes that you're suggesting - I am guessing crop, rotate, remove red eyes, adjust brightness, gamma, apply a few filters, etc. - one already can perform them without having to open GIMP: Digikam, Gwenview, F-Spot (I suppose, but it probably does) all have these features built-in.

For anything more complex than that, you probably will want to have something as capable as GIMP or Krita around, complexity and all. I just don't see what's there in between that justify these "lightweight" image editors. Kolourpaint would probably fit in that range but apart from the fact that it looks like an "enhanced MS Paint" it doesn't strike me as a terribly useful image editor (My daughters love it, though!).

The reason that they're better than GIMP usability wise is because GIMP does a lot more than they currently can and you can bet that the moment that they have to add these features, the complexity level will start to go up.

There is an application on Mac called Seahorse that claims to be exactly a GIMP clone minus the complexity and although a nice application, I just don't see any compelling reason to use it. And it does not appear to be THAT popular either which kind of adds to my point.

I think that it is great that we have people tackling these needs from different angles in order to come up with things that have better usability or that think of new ways to perform the same tasks. And it is even better that Mono can be used to produce these applications in such short period. But they're neither here nor there. Not yet.

As for the copying, no arguments there. It is great that some projects can borrow code and ideas from other projects and create something new off it. That's the whole purpose of Open Source after all! I don't know why some people get so hung up on it...

Edited 2010-02-08 21:14 UTC

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