Linked by Kroc Camen on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:04 UTC
Internet Explorer I am almost flabbergasted by the spin and blunt-face upon which this news is delivered. We were just discussing the pot calling the kettle black with Apple / Adobe and now Microsoft have also come out in favour of a closed video format for an open web--IE9's HTML5 video support will allow H264 only. Update Now that the initial shock is over, I've rewritten the article to actually represent news rather than something on Twitter.
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RE[4]: 1-2 Punch
by segedunum on Fri 30th Apr 2010 11:56 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: 1-2 Punch"
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

Microsoft is just following what the industry is already doing.

Are they? HTML5 video has not yet been established nor is there any standard format for it. People want to try and enforce a restrictive one, but they are likely to be disappointed.

If they had said that IE9's HTML5 implementation would "only support VC-1 (WMV/WMVHD)" then the complaints would make more sense to me.

That's not going to happen simply because it would be like a butterfly farting. No one would notice because there is sod all useful or interesting on the internet that uses it.

Back to my original point: The rest of the industry is already going with H.264. Microsoft is following in that.

There is currently no standard for HTML5 video and no one has yet gone with anything apart from their personal choices.

Microsoft doesn't control this. If anyone does, it's Apple.

Since Apple have no content to dictate terms then I find that suprising. You seem to be labelling Apple as the 'rest of the industry', which is pretty laughable.

Theora's nowhere near as good as H.264 (or VC-1 for that matter), according to tests (that I think I've seen cited even by Theora backers here).

For internet video then that is entirely subjective. Besides, we'll end up having VP8 on that score so that argument will get non-existent if it isn't already when it comes to internet video.

But doing that would lead to H.264 as the one and only HTML5 standard anyway because if IE is neutral and the rest of the industry picks H.264, then H.264 wins.

If sites like YouTube don't use it then it's irrelevant. You know that as well as I, I suspect. If there's no content for a browser then no one cares.

I'm afraid people who think IE and Safari are somehow relevant in the world of a new web standard where Apple and Microsoft don't create any of the cool new content people actually want are going to be sorely disappointed. No one is going to demand that YouTube supports h.264 so that they can get all of the cool features in their browsers that their friends have got and they haven't. Really, people hate IE enough already as it is.

Edited 2010-04-30 12:09 UTC

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