Linked by Igor Ljubuncic on Mon 21st Jun 2010 09:35 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption I've bored the readers of my personal website to death with two rather prosaic articles debating the Linux security model, in direct relation to Windows and associated claims of wondrous infections and lacks thereof. However, I haven't yet discussed even a single program that you can use on your Linux machine to gauge your security. For my inaugural article for OSNews, I'll leave the conceptual stuff behind, and focus on specific vectors of security, within the world of reason and moderation that I've created and show you how you can bolster a healthy strategy with some tactical polish, namely software.
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RE[5]: Security
by wirespot on Tue 22nd Jun 2010 09:10 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Security"
wirespot
Member since:
2006-06-21

They aren't more secure than Windows anymore. At one time, sure. Now? No.


Ah, but what do you mean by "Windows" and "Linux"? If you mean an install with just the OS and an interface, let's assume you're right. Windows 7 has made great strides into closing remote vulnerabilities and has taken protections such as ASLR, sandboxing IE etc. Remote breaking into Windows 7 through IE8 has been called one of the biggest modern challenges in security.

But a working PC also contains a large number of applications. This is where the cookie crumbles.

The Windows applications come in huge numbers, they are mostly closed source and they are not updated in a centralized manner. Plus, Windows users consider it normal to download stuff off any website they run into, not to mention downloading and running dubious cracks and keygens. What's more, they've become complacent about having malware in their machine.

Contrast this with Linux apps which are fewer, mostly open sourced, come 99% from trusted repositories, the update system is centralized and automated, and there's usually no need to go and install cracks. And a Linux user who finds a single piece of malware on their machine will be absolutely horrified.

Basically, the Windows userland is a security nightmare.

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