Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Oct 2010 22:20 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless While we rail on Apple for its closed and restrictive policies regarding its iOS, with Apple you at least know what you're getting into. When you buy a mobile phone running Android, many do so because of its open and more free nature than the competing platforms - so you can imagine the surprise when the hackers at xda-developers found out the brand-new T-Mobile G2 has a hardware rootkit that will always restore the phone's original operating system upon installing a different ROM. HTC says it doesn't know of any such feature, and points towards the carrier (or Google).
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RE: Hold your horses
by roblearns on Thu 7th Oct 2010 21:08 UTC in reply to "Hold your horses"
roblearns
Member since:
2010-09-13

You are confusing issues. If you sign a contract you will abide by its terms.

One of the terms, is if you cancel early, you pay an early termination fee. That is purely a financial consideration. So, imagine I got my G2, paid the early termination fee - I'm in complete compliance with the terms of my contract. Why do you think I can't do what I want, with my phone, that I bought, with my money?

Or, let says I get a G2, and one month later I decide I want a Samsung phone instead. I buy one off ebay. Why do you think I shouldn't be able to unlock my G2 and sell it to ebay? I'm carrying the contract to full term, so why can't I do what I want, with the phone that I own?

Stop confusing a contract, with a carrier lock.

Those carrier locks have nothing to do with your contract, and unlike your contract, they never expire.

Your 2g iPhone could be off contract for many years now, you could have upgraded to the 3g, the 3gs, and the iPhone 4 - and AT&T will never unlock that 2g iphone, not ever.

You must do it yourself.

I know a lot of people love big corporations - to each his own - but this is not about the contract - what enforces the contract, is the law. You owe what you owe, and believe me, they'll make you pay. It has nothing to do with the phone being locked or unlocked.

They want to lock the phone to their carrier, so that even if you complete all the terms of your contract, anyone who ever comes across that phone, even the 10th owner of the phone, 20 years from now, still must subscribe to their network.

And that, my friend....defend all you want - is ABSURD.

Edited 2010-10-07 21:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2