Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Oct 2010 13:53 UTC
Legal You think only "pirates" and "freeloaders" rail against current copyright laws? Well, think again - even the Library of Congress seemingly has had enough. The topic is recorded sound preservation, and in a 181-page in-depth study, the Library of Congress concludes that apart from technical difficulties, US copyright law makes it virtually impossible for anyone to perform any form of audio preservation. The painted picture is grim - very grim.
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RE[2]: Political Bit
by Neolander on Sat 9th Oct 2010 07:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Political Bit"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

Different money sources. If a candidate was bank rolled by the tech industry, you would see a more tech friendly agenda emerge.

Certainly not.

Simple examples : Sony (copyright), Apple (patents and copyright), Unisys (patents), MPEG-LA (patent-trolling institution), Thomson (MP3 patents)...

It seems that once a tech company becomes very big, it automatically becomes a jerk about copyright and patents. So in the end, having big players of the tech industry control political power will only lead to stronger copyright and patent legislation, killing more efficiently libraries* (for copyright) small business that could compete with them someday otherwise (for patents).



(* You might ask : "Why being such jerks about libraries ? Memorization of historical data benefits to everyone !". That's totally wrong. If it weren't for libraries, no one would know that Lord Camden quote that Thom is always mentioning. No one would realize that if Schroedinger patented quantum mechanics, technology today would look like what we had in the 80s. The sole sources of knowledge would be large distribution companies, like Sony and Apple, who would make sure that we don't have access to knowledge that's potentially dangerous for their business)

Edited 2010-10-09 07:35 UTC

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