Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Oct 2010 20:48 UTC
Microsoft Most websites glossed over this, but we didn't. Silverlight, once touted as Microsoft's answer to Adobe's Flash, has been retooled from its original purpose. Microsoft is betting big on HTML5 instead, turning Silverlight into the development platform for Windows Phone, and that's it. So... Silverlight is dead - long live Silerlight?
Permalink for comment 447762
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Umm...grand celebration plz?
by lemur2 on Sat 30th Oct 2010 12:18 UTC in reply to "RE: Umm...grand celebration plz?"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

Because anyone who knows anything about web dev, knows this isn't a big deal. Silverlight's huge presence outside of Netflix, is in Out of Browser apps, or WP7 apps.

And lol, Microsoft will use HTML5 alright, to push more Windows lock in. It's interesting you shun the .NET Developer divisions in Windows (which are more open to standards and interoperability, look at WCF, ADFS, Silverlight for Mac and Symbian) for the Windows division (with notorious history of lock in, who are all salivating to get your HTML5 web app to run better on Windows, faster on Windows, and eventually, only on Windows.)

There are two cultures inside Microsoft, and you're about to be reintroduced to the one you thought Silverlight masqueraded as for so long.

Good luck.


No, appearances would have it that Silverlight was just as much an attempt to gain lock-in to Microsoft products (so that users had to run Windows in order to be able to access the Internet) as any other ploy Microsoft has used.

Perhaps this article might help to explain the acute image problem that Microsoft now has:
http://www.acrossad.org/node/70

Microsoft's behaviour is arguably driving whole countries to adopt the very platform that Microsoft are trying to suppress. Microsoft has a long history of this:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/11/18/ballmer_linux_lawsuits/

Perhaps dropping Silverlight and adopting HTML5 is the first tentative move on Microsoft's part to try to repair this disastrous PR image problem they have generated for themselves.

Who knows? If it is, only good things can come of it.

Edited 2010-10-30 12:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0