Linked by Samuel J. Greear on Sun 31st Oct 2010 19:10 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives The 2.8.2 release of DragonFly BSD is now available, featuring significant advances in multi-processor performance based on DragonFly's signature soft token locks. It also includes many feature advancements including: pf from OpenBSD 4.2, the Wifi stack from FreeBSD and DataMapper from NetBSD (with significant enhancements). This release also marks the return of the GUI image. See the release notes for full details.
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RE[3]: The Crowd
by evilsjg on Mon 1st Nov 2010 02:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: The Crowd"
evilsjg
Member since:
2006-03-29

DragonFly and FreeBSD do not have binary compatibility with one another. That said, DragonFly has preserved ABI compatibility since it forked from FreeBSD, so in theory FreeBSD 4.x binaries should run on DragonFly. To my knowledge nobody has tested this in recent history (years). I cannot speak with authority on the compatibility of NetBSD and OpenBSD, but I would guess that binary compatibility does not exist. Different threading implementations makes this problematic.

What all of the BSD's do have, however, is a Linux binary compatibility layer. This isn't an emulation layer, per-se, it is a separate system call vector. Basically this means that the BSD kernels support multiple "sets" of system calls, one set supports native programs, another supports Linux programs. There is/has been some support for other systems too, such as SVR4. This binary compatibility is complete enough to run Linux versions of Flash, Java and OpenOffice to name a few.

While there isn't cross-BSD binary compatibility, generally software ports quite easily between the different BSD's, because of their common ancestry. DragonFly, for example, uses NetBSD's pkgsrc system and a large proportion of the software within that system compiled from the outset, without any additional patches.

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