Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Dec 2010 21:57 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Legal Well well well well well, paint me red and call me a girly scout. I've been saying for months now that there's much more collaboration between Apple and Microsoft than their respective fanboys want to believe, especially when it comes to fighting Google and Android, which both companies partly do via patent suits. More evidence for this has emerged today. Remember CPTN Holdings, the consortium led by Microsoft which bought that bundle of patents from Novell? Which other companies are part of this consortium? EMC. Oracle. Apple.
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

http://lwn.net/Articles/420487/

"The Document Foundation is a major free software project, and LibreOffice a key office suite for creating, managing and sharing documents. By becoming a licensee of the Open Invention Network, we fight software patents - which stifle innovation and encourage predatory business practices - and at the same time we improve the protection of our software projects," said Charles Schulz, Member of TDF Steering Committee.

Patents owned by Open Invention Network are available royalty-free to whichever company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert its patents against free software. Through this network of developers, distributors, sellers, resellers and end-users that license its patent portfolio, Open Invention Network is creating a supportive and shielded ecosystem to ensure the growth and adoption of free and open source software. This enables OIN licensees like The Document Foundation to make significant investments, helping to fuel economic growth.

OIN has amassed a broad portfolio of patents, including patents held by nominees on its behalf. These patents are available to all licensees as part of the patent portfolio that OIN is creating in support of free software.


My bold.

Pretty obvious step really for The Document Foundation (LibreOffice). I'm surprised they waited this long, actually, given that after January 23 there are 882 Novell patents that they would no longer have a chance to pick up a free license for.

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