Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Feb 2011 09:05 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless It's official. Dismissed as a silly rumour by many, Nokia and Micorsoft have just announced a very comprehensive partnership in which Windows Phone 7 will become Nokia's prime smartphone platform. It goes a lot deeper than that, though. Update: Qt will not be available for Windows Phone 7. Qt will remain the development platform for MeeGo and Symbian. Update II: During its Capital Market Day event, Elop confirmed Nokia will not make a comprehensive MeeGo product line. It will be a platform to learn from, but it won't become a competitive platform. Update III: Android was not an option because it would be difficult to differentiate there. Update IV: There will be 'substantial reductions in employment' in Finland and around the world. Also, before I forget, thanks Engadget for the live-blogging where I get this stuff from!
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RE[3]: Oh well
by henderson101 on Fri 11th Feb 2011 11:58 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh well"
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

Much of the delay with MeeGo was just that, the transition from Maemo which was a relatively stable and complete platform,.....


Really? Are you sure Maemo was "relatively stable and complete"??? It broke binary ABI with every major release. So, on the N800 alone, we had NITOS2007 and NITOS2008 then there were the 2 or 3 revisions of NITOS2008... so, basically 2006 -> 2007 broke ABI. 2007 -> 2008 broke ABI. 2008 broke ABI on itself. This is well documented and people were talking about it back *in* 2007!!!

http://eugenia.queru.com/2007/07/06/compatibility-compatibility-com...

Every ABI break lost apps. Sad. The pool of apps reduced over time, not increased. It would have been okay if there had actually been more than 2 or 3 that were worth having. *sigh*

EDIT: and the fact that the only option for development was Linux (which I was okay with) but installing the SDK was completely and totally un intuitive and cumbersome, AND was RPM based, so made installing on Ubuntu (which I much preferred over RPM style distros) extremely tricky... I dunno... I'm a Windows and Mac guy. I like installers that don't make me learn how to manually install software. ANd then, once installed - it was never straight forward to get it working and the emulation was flakey. A far cry from WinMobile, Android and iOS (all of which have their flaws, but at least they install without too many headaches and then just "work")

Edited 2011-02-11 12:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2