Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Sun 27th Feb 2011 12:06 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems This is a situation where I need the help of you OSnews readers who are experienced with low-level development on ARM, SPARC, PowerPC, MIPS, and other hardware architectures we have on computers nowadays. The issue is that I'm currently designing the part of my hobby kernel which takes care of interrupts. Although I mostly work on x86 at the moment, I'd like to keep this code portable to other hardware architectures in the future. To do that, I have to know how interrupt handling works on as much HW architectures as possible.
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RE[3]: What about OSDev forums ?
by silix on Mon 28th Feb 2011 15:21 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What about OSDev forums ?"
silix
Member since:
2006-03-01

Thats the problem with closed source software [...]

no, it isn't
think about this: in the early 80's, when the AT platform was headed to become the de facto industrial standard but wasn't yet, who were its predominant users?
businesses, thus managers or more often employees - who could type the letters their boss dictated, on wordperfect rather than on a typewriter - and calculate the mortgage using lotus 123 rather than pen and paper - ie. the kind of person who just wants/needs) a tool to be productive with, and wants that tool to just work for as long as possible with as little hassle as possible - and who also could be bothered with installing it on themselves, if the installation process is as quick and as little error prone as possible
thus, people who would have gotten wordperfect or Lotus 123 as a package and installed it from binary, even if it had been open source
thinking that just because it was proprietary software, it forced people to use the PC, is a deluded perspective that ignores the fact that other platforms were either too costly (risc workstations) too niche, deemed inadequate for business use (amiga) by many, single sourced or simply not pushed by IBM, or lacked needed applications (neither closed nor open sourced) - so simply were not an option for office (and many home) users of the time

Linux runs well on it, but thats not enough for most people.

because most people don't really care about the underlying architecture, as long as deployed sw runs and will run in the future... but it really is a detail that doesnt touch them as amuch as those who make that sw - but that's not them

Edited 2011-02-28 15:28 UTC

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