Linked by David Adams on Thu 31st Mar 2011 15:42 UTC
Google Playtime is over in Android Land. Over the last couple of months Google has reached out to the major carriers and device makers backing its mobile operating system with a message: There will be no more willy-nilly tweaks to the software. No more partnerships formed outside of Google's purview. From now on, companies hoping to receive early access to Google's most up-to-date software will need approval of their plans. And they will seek that approval from Andy Rubin, the head of Google's Android group.
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I beg to differ
by karunko on Fri 1st Apr 2011 08:39 UTC
karunko
Member since:
2008-10-28

Everybody here is taking sides and arguing whether Android is open or not, if Google has turned evil and other fine points, BUT has anyone noticed that Bloomberg's piece is a bit light on actual facts or, for that matter, names?

Let's summarize the (so called) story:

- "This is the new reality described by about a dozen executives working at key companies in the Android ecosystem."

- "Over the past few months, according to several people familiar with the matter [...]"

- "[...] but people interviewed for this story say that Google has recently tightened its policies."

- "It's these types of actions that have prompted the gripes to the Justice Dept., says a person with knowledge of the matter."

- "And yet murmurs abound that Android's master has tightened up too much."


See what I mean? There are zero facts to support the notion that companies hoping to receive early access to Google's most up-to-date software will need approval of their plans. I mean, the only one being actually quoted is Nokia's Stephen Elop -- who has absolutely nothing to do with either Google or Android! ;-)

Of course where there's smoke there's usually fire but, as I see it, the real problem is a different one and, oddly enough, it's the only fact mentioned in the article: "Android's share of the smartphone market surged from 9 percent in 2009 to an industry-leading 31 percent worldwide". I'm sure this must be pissing quite a lot of people -- especially at Apple.


RT.

Edited 2011-04-01 08:40 UTC

Reply Score: 2