Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th May 2011 21:50 UTC, submitted by fran
Windows The ARM version of Windows 8 might have just become the most desired version of Windows in our hearts and minds. After us talking about legacy code and backwards compatibility in Windows for years now, an Intel senior vice president, Renee James, has just stated that Windows 8 on ARM will not have any form of compatibility for legacy applications whatsoever. Update: Microsoft has responded to Intel's claims. "Intel's statements during yesterday's Intel Investor Meeting about Microsoft's plans for the next version of Windows were factually inaccurate and unfortunately misleading," the company said, "From the first demonstrations of Windows on SoC, we have been clear about our goals and have emphasized that we are at the technology demonstration stage. As such, we have no further details or information at this time."
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Member since:
2008-09-11

"Just do the math:

Quad core 2 GHz ARM chips with dynamic recompilatin of x86 code would suffient for most programms that handle mainly text and numbers.

Multimedia and games are a different thing, but most enterprises would be happy with that as long as .NET and Java have native support.


Seriously, I wonder if some posters in this site do even know what a computer does. Other than "handling numbers" a microprocessor really doesn't do much (characters in text are nothing but numbers).

Once Intel gets their new 3D process going, their new Atoms will have a very good power/performance envelope. In fact they will be rather competitive with those mythical "quad 2GHz ARMs." Given the binary compatibility they offer, it is going to be really hard for ARM to break into the data center.

And yes, binary compatibility is still an issue. That is why SPARC still has a market.

Intel and Microsoft have a long history of playing these games to do hardball when it comes to negotiate. Microsoft always dangles the hardware abstraction angle to force intel to submit, and Intel always threatens Microsoft with their next big HW platform not based on MS. It is a dysfunctional dynamic duo.
"

Yep, see here: http://www.osnews.com/comments/24753

Well, MS doesn't depend on Intel and Intel doesn't depend on MS (at least theoretically).

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