Linked by snydeq on Tue 16th Aug 2011 16:46 UTC
Web 2.0 InfoWorld's Peter Wayner discusses the 11 hard truths Web developers must accept in making the most of HTML5 -- especially those who are looking to leverage HTML5 in hopes of unseating native apps. 'The truth is, despite its powerful capabilities, HTML5 isn't the solution for every problem. Its additional features are compelling and will help make Web apps formidable competitors for native apps, but security issues, limitations of local data storage, synchonization challenges, and politics should have us all scaling back our expectations for the spec.'
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RE: Buzzword
by reez on Tue 16th Aug 2011 23:36 UTC in reply to "Buzzword"
reez
Member since:
2006-06-28

That's right, but I actually like that move. They (WC3 folks) announced this earlier, so it isn't really buzz, like "Web 2.0". What they did is to put a lot of stuff. The markup, the protocols like Websockets, but also HTTP-P2P and Microformats, Canvas, WebGL, ... under one name, while developing these technologies independend from each other. And this is what I absolutely love, because it allows developers to have stuff that's ready and stable, while other things are still in development or even get dropped (like that offline SQL thingy).

This provides a lot of freedom. Something that has been achieved by attacking IE from all sides.

I know, it's not perfect, but it's still great.

About the topic. I think the way web apps get programmed will change. There are lots of great ideas coming from the Node.js folks for example. One has to have a look at the (AOL sponsored) Socketstream frameworks. It makes it _very_ easy to create real time (as in multiplayer racing games) web applications. It doesn't limit the developer and helps him with stuff like security. I doubt this is already the end of the road.

I know, I am probably too enthusiastic, but I really like how things develop in this area.

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