Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Nov 2011 21:26 UTC, submitted by edwin
General Unix Way back in 2002, MIT decided it needed to start teaching a course in operating system engineering. As part of this course, students would write an exokernel on x86, using Sixth Edition Unix (V6) and John Lions' commentary as course material. This, however, posed problems.
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RE[6]: binary for windows....
by jabjoe on Fri 11th Nov 2011 21:39 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: binary for windows.... "
jabjoe
Member since:
2009-05-06

The difference is that the kernel is kept simple.The complexity is handled by a package manager or similar instead. No dynamic linker to exploit or carefully harden.


Not really a kernel problem as the dynamic linker isn't really in the kernel.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_linker#ELF-based_Unix-like_sys...

What do you mean by this?


When something is statically linked, the library is dissolved, what is not used the dead stripper should remove. Your system is not like static linking. It's like baking dynamic linking.

This package depends on library packages, just like today, but those packages contain static rather than shared libraries. The install process then links the program.


Then you kind of loose some of the gains. You have to have dependencies sitting around waiting in case they are needed. Or you have a repository to pull them down from....

No, just the normal package manager dependency resolution.


That was my point.

No, to the contrary! App folders use dynamic linking for libraries included with the application.


Yes.

I'm talking about using static libraries even when delivering them separately.


As I said before, it's not really static, it's baked dynamic. Also if you have dependencies separate you either have loads kicking about in case they are need (Windows) or you have package management. If you have package management all you get out of this is baking dynamic linking. For no gain I can see.....

Zero-install is an alternative to package managers.

It's quite different as it's decentralized using these application folders. Application folders are often put forwards by some as a solution to dependencies.

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