Linked by Linux Review on Tue 20th Mar 2012 17:07 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source It's been a while since we caught up with Stallman. But a couple months ago we took a look around at what's happening with law, politics and technology and realized that he maybe perhaps his extremism and paranoia were warranted all along. So when we were contacted by an Iranian Linux publication and asked if we would like to publish an English translation of a recent interview they had done with Stallman, I thought that it was a particularly rich opportunity.
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RE[7]: Re:
by shmerl on Wed 21st Mar 2012 22:36 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Re:"
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

The only people it affects are the ones that choose to use it...
If people would simply choose to neither buy it OR break it... Well it would go away rather quickly. Don't buy things that are not in fact what you actually want.


If there would be an alternative choice - why not. Who would care about DRM in such case. But, the point is that the industry which pushes DRM tries to eliminate any alternative choice. Consider DVDs, Blu-rays and etc. If one could easily get the same stuff without DRM - that would be voting with the wallet. Can you actually do it? I.e. no reason to pretend that DRM is purely optional. Those who push it try their best to make it mandatory across the board (up to building it into the hardware). And that's immoral forcing of preemptive policing, as mentioned above.

It is NOT your data - that is my whole point. It is the right holder's data...
the problem is how the product is licensed...

Yes, yes. Everyone knows that's what they want it to be. No point even to discuss this nonsense which they push on people. In essence you buy content, and not licenses. And regardless whether IP rules and practices are all messed up, even if you say that you bought just the license, preemptive policing is still immoral.

Edited 2012-03-21 22:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5