Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st May 2012 20:03 UTC
Windows For Microsoft, the traditional desktop is old news. It's on its way out, it's legacy, and the harder they claim the desktop has equal rights, the sillier it becomes. With companies, words are meaningless, it's actions that matter, and here Microsoft's actions tell the real story. The company has announced the product line-up for Visual Studio 11, and the free Express can no longer be used to create desktop applications. Message is clear.
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Twitter OS
by Moredhas on Mon 21st May 2012 20:48 UTC
Moredhas
Member since:
2008-04-10

I'll restate what I've said before: I want nothing to do with Twitter OS. Unfortunately, as a computer salesman and technician, I'm going to have to learn to like it, no matter how painful it gets. People are already not educating themselves enough to do simple things with their computers, they take the attitude that because we're there to fix them, they don't need to learn how to use them (imagine applying that logic to cars, don't bother learning how to drive, the mechanic can fix your fuckups, and you can act all indignant when he expects to be paid for it!). Just wait until an entire new paradigm gets dropped on the average-Joe user. Most of the people using computers today, I think it would be fair to say, never used anything but Windows XP, with a percentage of those people migrating to 7 when they were left with no choice (but there are a lot of XP machines still going through our workshop), and people hate change. They hate the superficial cosmetic differences between XP and 7 (from a use-case scenario, but there is a lot less superficial stuff going on under the hood), and they're going to loathe having their much practiced desktop taken away. A Windows 8 world will really lower the barrier for people not in the know to get a Mac, or at least raise the barrier to Windows high enough that a Mac seems an easier option, and among the technically inclined, it might push some small growth to Linux. I wouldn't count on that, though. Year of the Linux Desktop will never come, unless someone like Canonical can team up with a big vendor who'll exclusively push Linux in their lineup, and actually market it (unlike Dell, who had less than a handfull of Linux machines on offer, buried them in their website, and had "Dell recommends Windows 7" banners plastered all around them).

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