Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 31st May 2012 11:11 UTC
Fedora Core "Fedora 18 will be released at around the same time as Windows 8, and as previously discussed all Windows 8 hardware will be shipping with secure boot enabled by default. [...] We've been working on a plan for dealing with this. It's not ideal, but of all the approaches we've examined we feel that this one offers the best balance between letting users install Fedora while still permitting user freedom." Wait for it... "Our first stage bootloader will be signed with a Microsoft key."
Permalink for comment 520155
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Restricted Boot -> Restricted OS
by Alfman on Thu 31st May 2012 15:37 UTC
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

For those who just read the summary here on OSNews, here are some additional excerpts you really must read. There are very wide-ranging implications for the future of open source kernel development on new secure boot platforms.


"Secure boot is built on the idea that all code that can touch the hardware directly is trusted, and any untrusted code must go through the trusted code. This can be circumvented if users can execute arbitrary code in the kernel. So, we'll be moving to requiring signed kernel modules and locking down certain aspects of kernel functionality... Userspace modesetting will be a thing of the past..."

"Signed modules are obviously troubling from a user perspective. We'll be signing all the drivers that we ship, but what about out of tree drivers? We don't have a good answer for that yet..."

"A lot of our users want to build their own kernels. Some even want to build their own distributions. Signing our bootloader and kernel is an impediment to that. We'll be providing all the tools we use for signing our binaries, but for obvious reasons we can't hand out our keys."

"Microsoft's certification requirements for ARM machines forbid vendors from offering the ability to disable secure boot or enrol user keys. While we could support secure boot in the same way as we plan to on x86, it would prevent users from running modified software unless they paid money for a signing key. We don't find that acceptable and so have no plans to support it."

Reply Score: 3