Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 16th Jun 2012 17:52 UTC
Windows Adrian Kingsley-Hughes pens a rant on Windows 8, calling it 'awful': "I'm now ready to sum up my Windows 8 experience with a single word: awful. I could have chosen a number of other words - terrible, horrible, painful and execrable all spring to mind - but it doesn't matter, the sentiment is the same." I've been using Windows 8 Release Preview on both my ZenBook and my regular desktop since its release, and here's my short review: "I like it." Issues a-plenty, but for what is essentially a 1.0 release - not bad. It's a hell of a lot better than other releases which were similar in scope (Mac OS X 10.0, KDE 4.0).
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RE: One may like it or not
by contextfree on Sun 17th Jun 2012 01:26 UTC in reply to "One may like it or not"
contextfree
Member since:
2009-06-01

Although I've been defending W8 a lot here I actually agree.

The problem is that people are willing to deal with a learning curve, but only when the benefit at the end is clear and considerable. Unfortunately, Windows 8, even once you've learned it (and by "learned" I don't just mean knowing how to use it, but internalizing it so you do things without consciously thinking about it), is only a little better than 7 on non-tablets. The Start screen is better in some ways and worse in others, overall net better IMO, but only slightly. Metro style apps are nice to have, but on desktop/laptop more like improved gadgets than applications that have a huge impact on your workflow. The desktop improvements are nice but minor. Overall the benefits are just too small not to be drowned out by FUD about an apparent massive change (that isn't as big as it looks). "Buy our new product, it will appear to be hugely disruptive to your work, but once you get over the pain of adaptation, you'll realize it's actually not that different and slightly better than what you had before!" just isn't a great sales pitch.

(There is also the problem that Metro style apps and cloud push are moving computing further in the walled garden, Big Brother-ish direction, which I do think is a valid concern though not specific to W8)

I bet Windows 9 will be much better received, not necessarily because it "fixes" things that are broken in 8 (though people will say that's the reason ), but because it will add enough cool/useful new stuff that perceived benefits > perceived pain of adoption.

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