Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 10:12 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Only a few more hours until the last of the big three has its big event (Google i/o, after WWDC and Microsoft's Surface and WP8 events). They will most likely announce a Nexus tablet, as well as Android 4.1, Jelly Bean. While many of you are still on Gingerbread with your top-of-the-line phones - let me poke a few eyes out with mikegapinski's Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich port... To the Samsung Wave. Dual-booting Bada 2 and ICS, right here.
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RE[7]: Comment by avgalen
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 13:39 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by avgalen"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

The problem is - this is EXACTLY how open source development works, and thus, is a good example of how openness works. Someone wants to do something, does it, and dumps the code out there as soon as possible, and as often as possible - even if things don't work yet. This is actually a good thing, as it's basically an invitation for other people to join in and fix the issues that remain. How many cool projects are going on within closed-source companies that we never get to see because they don't follow release early/often?

This is such a core concept of open source development that I can reasonably expect not to have to explain this any longer. If you don't get this and complain about things not working in a first release, then yes, I will assume you have little to no knowledge on how open source development works - so I suggested you read up on the concept.

I never said this was a the best or perfect example of open source development - it's just an example of openness at work. That's it. Of course Linux is a better example. Of course Apache is a better example. Of course FreeBSD is a better example.

However, all the countless projects that spawned from those? They are just as much a core aspect of open source as their parent projects. So yes, a lone developer, building upon the work that came before him and from the AOSP's code, is a good example of openness at work.

Edited 2012-06-27 13:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5