Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Jul 2012 22:17 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia board chairman Risto Siilasmaa went on a Finnish television show, and stated that while he is confident in Windows Phone 8, the company does have a back-up plan if it doesn't work out. Speculation aplenty - what is this backup plan? The answer's pretty easy, if you ask me.
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RE: Well...
by zima on Mon 9th Jul 2012 23:12 UTC in reply to "Well..."
zima
Member since:
2005-07-06

Nokia pretends CDMA never even existed [...]
And yes, I've heard the rumors of a CDMA Nokia device being tested in Asian markets, but that's been over a year ago and was a flimsy two-paragraph "report" to begin with.

And did those CDMA Nokia phones ever materialize? I tried to find out if they really exist

Looks like more than a rumour, very much existing, to me... http://www.nokia.com/cn-zh/products/phone/800c/
http://www.developer.nokia.com/Devices/Device_specifications/800C/

And Nokia had some CDMA2000 phones in the past (search on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nokia_products ). Yeah, not too many... but among the few countries where that standard really sees some significant adoption, you have one place firmly in the grips of carriers (dictating / castrating phones in the past, they didn't seem to go along well with Nokia; oh, and the manufacturer of the standard had long-standing hostilities with Nokia), plus some more or less US colonies (so I suppose the trends in adoption of handsets might also partly spill over), including two which have few very strong mobile phone manufacturers of their own - and one of the manufacturers is the very same chaebol responsible for local CDMA2k network, LG U+.
Meanwhile & unusually, Nokia didn't have much presence, in more or less just those places, even when it comes to GSM phones and carriers.

Well, then there's China... I suppose it might be about them pragmatically desiring to gain experience with all the tech from throughout the world - each of the Chinese three major networks is based on different standard: one network with pure GSM family, one with domestic experiment, and one with CDMA2k (fairly standard one, contrary to what one poster nearby claims, probably confusing it with the 2nd; but I guess handset portability might still be a problem if you'd import it, SIM cards didn't become universal in CDMA2k networks so you're at the mercy of a carrier to enable the phone in their network...)

And you know, ultimately iPhones have one-digit percentage of adoption... (when it comes to phones in use, among worldwide 5+ billion mobile subscribers)

Edited 2012-07-09 23:29 UTC

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