Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Jul 2012 01:24 UTC
Microsoft "Microsoft and Perceptive Pixel Inc. (PPI) today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Microsoft will acquire PPI, a recognized leader in research, development and production of large-scale, multi-touch display solutions." Yes, Jeff Han is now a Microsoft employee. This demo still amazes me - from 2006. Before the iPhone. Before Android. Before the iPad. Remember that the next time you wind up in a discussion about who supposedly invented what.
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RE: I built one too!
by zima on Tue 10th Jul 2012 17:22 UTC in reply to "I built one too!"
zima
Member since:
2005-07-06

Just take a pane of glass and put it in a frame full of LEDs on the sides...seal it up and touch the glass, now fingerprints will shine through. Place something partially opaque against the glass to project an image onto

Some folks at Nokia Research Center Tampere built such style of touchscreen out of ice, some time ago:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbtrI6GjBsk
http://research.nokia.com/news/11362
Not sure how useful the experiment was, for Nokia, but it looks like they had some fun (so perhaps team-bonding usefulness)

And in the related of the above video, there's http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7ENumwMohs - ~AutoCAD on... Perceptive Pixel.

Bringing back the drafting board could end up awesome (but make it properly tilted...), when expanding it further in ways which ~desktop UI cannot (present CAD user interaction definitely also lost something when "upgrading" from drafting boards).
Similar with music software, video editing, photos. Perhaps that's what MS sees with Metro (and forcing the thing now, a bit, so the software will be ready when inexpensive large displays arrive in a few years) - sure, it's a bit awkward now, but their desktop OS also really took off only with 3.x...

Note: They say to use IR so it doesn't interfere with visible light, but visible spectrum works never the less and could be filtered/tracked easily with a web cam.

BTW, webcam sensors are sensitive to near-IR, and many webcams can be easily modified to see it: just remove the IR filter in the lens (or, to see it only: replace the IR filter with visible light filter that lets through IR - the dark areas at the ends of photographic film work decently, IIRC)

Edited 2012-07-10 17:29 UTC

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