Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 8th Aug 2012 06:23 UTC
Legal "The 2010 report, translated from Korean, goes feature by feature, evaluating how Samsung's phone stacks up against the iPhone. Authored by Samsung's product engineering team, the document evaluates everything from the home screen to the browser to the built in apps on both devices. In each case, it comes up with a recommendation on what Samsung should do going forward and in most cases its answer is simple: Make it work more like the iPhone." Pretty damning. We still need to know a few things: how many of these were actually implemented? How common are these types of comparisons (i.e., does Apple have them)? Are these protected by patents and the like? And, but that's largely irrelevant and mostly of interest to me because I'm a translator myself, who translated the document, and how well has he or she done the job?
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RE[7]: Common practice
by akrosdbay on Wed 8th Aug 2012 13:04 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Common practice"
akrosdbay
Member since:
2008-06-09

You are actually saying exactly what I mean: that there is no vacuum in which Apple created the iPhone. That's the whole point. The technology world is like a language, where every individual speaker adds to the language, and over time, it evolves. We would think someone crazy if he were to patent words and grammar that make up the language and start suing people for constructing different sentences using these words and grammar. If he were allowed to do this, it would cause massive damage to a language and the arts.

Yet, that's exactly what Apple and Microsoft are doing, and we have people cheering them on for it. It boggles the mind.



So you are saying people should not copyright works of literature because language already existed. You would then have no problem if another site just took content of OSNews verbatim and started cloning it, right? Since you didn't invent any of the tech used to run this site or the English language itself.

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