Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2012 22:52 UTC
Linux Miguel de Icaza: "To sum up: (a) First dimension: things change too quickly, breaking both open source and proprietary software alike; (b) incompatibility across Linux distributions. This killed the ecosystem for third party developers trying to target Linux on the desktop. You would try once, do your best effort to support the 'top' distro or if you were feeling generous 'the top three' distros. Only to find out that your software no longer worked six months later. Supporting Linux on the desktop became a burden for independent developers." Mac OS X came along to scoop up the Linux defectors.
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RE[2]: Comment by Vordreller
by Dave_K on Thu 30th Aug 2012 14:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Vordreller"
Dave_K
Member since:
2005-11-16

users have a problem with fragmentation and users are really pissed off when the first answer to whatever problems they have is "you chose the wrong distribution"


I started finding that funny after a while when I was trying to get a Linux distribution working on my Thinkpad.

I must have been told at least a dozen times that the problems I was experiencing were due to running the wrong distribution, with a different "correct" distribution recommended each time. In the end the one I managed to get more-or-less working (Scientific Linux) wasn't even one of the ones I'd been told to use.

The Thinkpad specific GUI utilities (that initially fooled me into thinking that Linux would be as easily installed as Windows) were packaged for different distributions and didn't work when compiled from source. I ended up having to spend a couple of weekends reading howtos and configuring everything manually, but at least I finally got it working OK.

Of course I'd be a lot less sanguine about the experience if I'd had to use Linux as my main OS, rather than it being a hobby that I could set aside as soon as its problems became too frustrating.

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