Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 17th Sep 2012 18:12 UTC
Legal "Nothing is original, says Kirby Ferguson, creator of Everything is a Remix. From Bob Dylan to Steve Jobs, he says our most celebrated creators borrow, steal and transform. Kirby Ferguson explores creativity in a world where 'everything is a remix'." In 9 minutes and 42 seconds, Ferguson explains in plain English why patent and copyright law is fundamentally broken.
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RE[3]: This is blasphemy
by linux-lover on Mon 17th Sep 2012 23:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: This is blasphemy"
linux-lover
Member since:
2011-04-25

I just don't get the point of this. Is the argument that because everything is connected to what came before that there is no such thing as intellectual property? Because if so it's a pretty silly position to take.

If there is a such a thing as IP then the question becomes trickier - where to draw the line.


It's pathetic we have to draw lines to prevent patents like "Searching for Goods on the Internet" or Pinch to Zoom and slide to unlock.
Yes, Searching for goods on the internet is patented.

http://www.google.com/patents/US8214342?dq=Meirsonne+,+Michael%...
Read the overview on that link.

Now, that patent was granted this year.


I can only conceive of 2 logical explanations:
1) That patent office is filled with uninformed, people with little to zero knowledge in the field regarding the patent. ESPECIALLY so for Software. They also never seem to check for prior art.

2) Bribery

Another example would be: http://www.google.com/patents/US6339780
A patent clerk in 1996 might not even know what a web browser was. The name "Micrsoft" probably added some legitimacy to the patent application too.

Another thing I have found, is nobody can seem to agree on what should be classified as "obvious".

Then again, software patents should not even be legitimate. Software in it's primal form is really mathematics and logic. Neither of those are patent-able.

Software is written and writing is protected by copyright, not patents. Software only needs a copyright for protection.

See the thing I have found, is nobody can seem to agree on what should be classified as "obvious".

Reply Parent Score: 7