Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 12th Nov 2012 23:01 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The abuse of push notifications is spreading across the App Store. As a result, users are starting to reflexively reject app requests to send push notifications. I always allow apps to send me push notifications, just so I can see what other app developers are doing. Here is a collection of valueless, invasive, and annoying push notifications that I've received recently." Perfect illustration of why one of the usual arguments for strongly curated application stores - quality control - is, as it stands now, pure nonsense. A decent quality control system would bar all these applications from the store. Similar stuff is going on in the Windows 8 application store: a never-ending stream of ugly, pointless crap nobody cares about. Heck, many of them do not even have a tile icon! The end result is that whether you go to Google Play or the App Store, 99.9% is crap. I would much rather have a very restrictive, quality-focussed store - but with an option to enable sideloading. The way application stores work today in no way leads to better quality applications than with plain-old internet distribution. In fact, I'd argue things have gotten worse, not better, due to application store spam.
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Missing the point
by whartung on Tue 13th Nov 2012 19:51 UTC
whartung
Member since:
2005-07-06

Perfect illustration of why one of the usual arguments for strongly curated application stores - quality control - is, as it stands now, pure nonsense.


And here is the mistake being made.

Perhaps Apple is not enforcing its guidelines strongly enough. Perhaps they're not being informed of the violations to the guidelines. Thus, the suggestions to make reporting easier. And perhaps there needs to be a better way of informing novice users about their options in this regard.

But the key difference between the walled garden of the App Store and the unruly wild wild west of non-vetted apps is simply that something CAN be done about it.

The guideline is in place. Given enough motivation (perhaps through public awareness articles like these), then offending apps can be removed instantly. "Bad app, no key for you" and boom -- it's off the app store.

We also don't know how much more we would perhaps be suffering were the guideline and vetting process not in place.

But the simple fact that Apple can yank your key away and put you out of the App Store business at a moments notice is certainly enough to give some sinister parties pause, if not necessarily all.

Apple can certainly be asleep at the switch here in this case, and an unenforced rule is not better than no rule at all. I don't suffer this problem on my phone (but I don't have zillions of apps either). But the switch is in place, and can be thrown when and if the sleeping tiger awakes. Maybe articles like this one can act as a pointy stick to awaken it.

Edited 2012-11-13 19:51 UTC

Reply Score: 2