Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Nov 2012 22:12 UTC
Internet Explorer "In Windows 8, we reimagined the browser with IE10. We designed and built IE10 to be the best way to experience the Web on Windows. With the IE10 Release Preview for Windows 7 consumers can now enjoy a fast and fluid Web with the updated IE10 engine on their Windows 7 devices. The release preview of IE10 on Windows 7 is available for download today."
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

This is akin to saying that the current worst-of-the-bunch is a lot better than the previous worst-of-the-bunch. It holds for not only the JS engines, but also for the rest of the browser.


While you may scoff, we now have all major browsers with decent JS engines, that is a massive win for all web developers.

It isn't much to crow about, is it? With the first release of IE6, Microsoft had the best browser client of any. Microsoft had clearly lost that lead by October 2006 with the release of Firefox 2.


Who cares, that is now ancient history.

They have been a long way behind other leading browsers ever since.


Not anymore.

IE 9 is a pretty fast browsers and are a good default browser to the world's best selling desktop operating system, Windows 7.

Nobody really uses browsers because they do better in the Sunspider benchmark.

This is clearly reflected in the market share trends:
http://gs.statcounter.com/?PHPSESSID=j2juf5bil673j4vrso39eijui6#bro.....


http://news.softpedia.com/news/IE9-Usage-Share-Bigger-than-Those-of...

Err ... no.

IE10 doesn't appear to be the version of IE that can arrest this persistent slide, especially if it is the worst performed modern browser, it provides the least features, and it misses out on basic things like open codec support that could easily have been provided at next-to-zero cost.


There are reasons why Microsoft moves at a slower rate with IE as I have already pointed out in my previous comment.

TBH, open codec support is pretty minor, with the majority of the web still using Flash Video.

Major HTML 5 features and the fact that it can now do Strict mode for ECMAScript, is far more important.

Being a Web-developer, these are the features we want ... I have no interest in some idealistic fight over a video codec.

I have written my recommendations in my blog post here

http://luke-robbins.co.uk/video-on-the-web/

And nothing has changed.

If Web Developers want IE to have better standards support, they should use the platform previews and give feedback to Microsoft (via bug reports).

If you want to troll, actually try to do better than quoting hipster web developers ... which will hate on IE no matter what.

Edited 2012-11-15 11:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3