Linked by nfeske on Thu 29th Nov 2012 17:38 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes With the just released version 12.11, the developers of the Genode OS Framework are celebrating the break-through to execute the entire build system based on GCC 4.7.2 within their genuine operating-system environment. The new release gets accompanied with new audio drivers from the Open Sound System project, extended support for OMAP4, and numerous stability and performance improvements concerning the underlying kernel platforms.
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RE[7]: I feel like a thicko
by nfeske on Tue 4th Dec 2012 13:43 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: I feel like a thicko"
nfeske
Member since:
2009-05-27

I hope that I'm not overly generalizing, but as far as I know, most "RTOS" solutions do not support address spaces, which, however, would be the solely defining point of being a microkernel-based OS. The scheduler, applications, drivers, and networking code tend to be executed in a single address space with no memory protection at all. This is ok for the typical use cases where they are deployed because all userland code is regarded as trusted anyway. So the desire to protect userland components from each other is not very strong in these scenarios. The baseband processor you just mentioned is such a scenario.

Microkernels become attractive not before multiple third-party (and potentially untrusted) components must be integrated on one platform. For example, OK-Labs used to argue that by using their OKL4 microvisor product, baseband functionality and Android can be executed on a single processor, yet both remain isolated from each other. So when using their product, no separate baseband processor is needed anymore. According to their website, they are pretty successful: "The Next Billion Devices" they state. (Admittedly, I am not sure if this number refers to the microvisor or their pico product. The latter seems to be more of an RTOS than a microkernel.)

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