Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Dec 2012 19:50 UTC
Windows The HTC HD2 is probably one of the most enduring mobile phones out there. While it originally shipped with Windows Mobile way back in 2009, it has become one of the most hacker-friendly devices out there, and hackers have managed to port virtually everything to the device - various versions of Android, MeeGo, Ubuntu, and Windows Phone have found their way to the HD2. Russian hacker Cotulla, responsible for many of these ports, has just announced the next big port: Windows RT is now running on the HD2.
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tanzam75
Member since:
2011-05-19

In any case, as for the RAM requirements, I think you're way too optimistic there - the measures you gave most probably don't include shared libraries and a host of other resources (OSes like to lie about such things).


That's true, but again, it's still not the whole story.

There's an MSO.DLL and an MSORES.DLL that collectively take up 210 MB of RAM. But these are loaded once -- even if you load all the Office programs simultaneously.

And even then, it doesn't actually take up 210 MB of physical memory. Remember that Windows NT has a demand-paged virtual memory system. Those files are demand-paged into memory, 4 KB at a time. Until one of the Office programs actually calls a function located on a certain page, then that page is not actually taking up any RAM.

As for disk resources, I see no reason for them to inflate 8x, even with added functionality - I mean, we're talking nearly a full DVD's worth of data, the equivalent of some 100000 full-PAL JPEG images.


The Excel icon now takes 173 KB of disk space. One icon. (At 256x256, 32-bit color, as a high-quality PNG.) Now think about how many other icons there are in Office.

And not just icons. Fonts. The new equation editor. A new ligatures-aware layout engine. New PivotTables. More accurate statistics functions (the old ones are still there, to get bug-for-bug backward compatibility).

One man's bloat is another man's feature. You may not use a given feature, but other people do.

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